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Propionate-producing consortium restores antibiotic-induced dysbiosis in a dynamic in vitro model of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem

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Abstract
Metabolic syndrome is a growing public health concern. Efforts at searching for links with the gut microbiome have revealed that propionate is a major fermentation product in the gut with several health benefits toward energy homeostasis. For instance, propionate stimulates satiety-inducing hormones, leading to lower energy intake and reducing weight gain and associated risk factors. In (disease) scenarios where microbial dysbiosis is apparent, gut microbial production of propionate may be decreased. Here, we investigated the effect of a propionogenic bacterial consortium composed of Lactobacillus plantarum, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Ruminococcus obeum, Coprococcus catus, Bacteroides vulgatus, Akkermansia muciniphila, and Veillonella parvula for its potential to restore in vitro propionate concentrations upon antibiotic-induced microbial dysbiosis. Using the mucosal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME), we challenged the simulated colon microbiome with clindamycin. Addition of the propionogenic consortium resulted in successful colonization and subsequent restoration of propionate levels, while a positive effect on the mitochondrial membrane potential (19 m) was observed in comparison with the controls. Our results support the development and application of next generation probiotics, which are composed of multiple bacterial strains with diverse functionality and phylogenetic background.
Keywords
propionate, dysbioses, consortium, human intestinal, microbiome, metabolic disease, CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS, GUT MICROBIOTA, METABOLIC SYNDROME, COLON, COMMUNITY, QUANTIFICATION, INFLAMMATION, ENGRAFTMENT, STABILITY, SECRETION

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MLA
El Hage, Racha, et al. “Propionate-Producing Consortium Restores Antibiotic-Induced Dysbiosis in a Dynamic in Vitro Model of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem.” FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY, vol. 10, 2019.
APA
El Hage, R., Hernandez Sanabria, E., Calatayud Arroyo, M., Props, R., & Van de Wiele, T. (2019). Propionate-producing consortium restores antibiotic-induced dysbiosis in a dynamic in vitro model of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem. FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY, 10.
Chicago author-date
El Hage, Racha, Emma Hernandez Sanabria, Marta Calatayud Arroyo, Ruben Props, and Tom Van de Wiele. 2019. “Propionate-Producing Consortium Restores Antibiotic-Induced Dysbiosis in a Dynamic in Vitro Model of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem.” FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY 10.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
El Hage, Racha, Emma Hernandez Sanabria, Marta Calatayud Arroyo, Ruben Props, and Tom Van de Wiele. 2019. “Propionate-Producing Consortium Restores Antibiotic-Induced Dysbiosis in a Dynamic in Vitro Model of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem.” FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY 10.
Vancouver
1.
El Hage R, Hernandez Sanabria E, Calatayud Arroyo M, Props R, Van de Wiele T. Propionate-producing consortium restores antibiotic-induced dysbiosis in a dynamic in vitro model of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem. FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY. 2019;10.
IEEE
[1]
R. El Hage, E. Hernandez Sanabria, M. Calatayud Arroyo, R. Props, and T. Van de Wiele, “Propionate-producing consortium restores antibiotic-induced dysbiosis in a dynamic in vitro model of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem,” FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY, vol. 10, 2019.
@article{8632333,
  abstract     = {Metabolic syndrome is a growing public health concern. Efforts at searching for links with the gut microbiome have revealed that propionate is a major fermentation product in the gut with several health benefits toward energy homeostasis. For instance, propionate stimulates satiety-inducing hormones, leading to lower energy intake and reducing weight gain and associated risk factors. In (disease) scenarios where microbial dysbiosis is apparent, gut microbial production of propionate may be decreased. Here, we investigated the effect of a propionogenic bacterial consortium composed of Lactobacillus plantarum, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Ruminococcus obeum, Coprococcus catus, Bacteroides vulgatus, Akkermansia muciniphila, and Veillonella parvula for its potential to restore in vitro propionate concentrations upon antibiotic-induced microbial dysbiosis. Using the mucosal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME), we challenged the simulated colon microbiome with clindamycin. Addition of the propionogenic consortium resulted in successful colonization and subsequent restoration of propionate levels, while a positive effect on the mitochondrial membrane potential (19 m) was observed in comparison with the controls. Our results support the development and application of next generation probiotics, which are composed of multiple bacterial strains with diverse functionality and phylogenetic background.},
  articleno    = {1206},
  author       = {El Hage, Racha and Hernandez Sanabria, Emma and Calatayud Arroyo, Marta and Props, Ruben and Van de Wiele, Tom},
  issn         = {1664-302X},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN MICROBIOLOGY},
  keywords     = {propionate,dysbioses,consortium,human intestinal,microbiome,metabolic disease,CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS,GUT MICROBIOTA,METABOLIC SYNDROME,COLON,COMMUNITY,QUANTIFICATION,INFLAMMATION,ENGRAFTMENT,STABILITY,SECRETION},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {17},
  title        = {Propionate-producing consortium restores antibiotic-induced dysbiosis in a dynamic in vitro model of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.01206},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2019},
}

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