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A systematic review on the quantitative relationship between structural and functional network connectivity strength in mammalian brains

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Abstract
The mammalian brain is composed of densely connected and interacting regions, which form structural and functional networks. An improved understanding of the structure-function relation is crucial to understand the structural underpinnings of brain function and brain plasticity after injury. It is currently unclear how functional connectivity strength relates to structural connectivity strength. We obtained an overview of recent papers that report on correspondences between quantitative functional and structural connectivity measures in the mammalian brain. We included network studies in which functional connectivity was measured with resting-state fMRI, and structural connectivity with either diffusion-weighted MRI or neuronal tract tracers. Twenty-seven of the 28 included studies showed a positive structure-function relationship. Large inter-study variations were found comparing functional connectivity strength with either quantitative diffusion-based (correlation coefficient (r) ranges: 0.18-0.82) or neuronal tracer-based structural connectivity measures (r = 0.24-0.74). Two functional datasets demonstrated lower structure-function correlations with neuronal tracer-based (r = 0.22 and r = 0.30) than with diffusion-based measures (r = 0.49 and r = 0.65). The robust positive quantitative structure-function relationship supports the hypothesis that structural connectivity provides the hardware from which functional connectivity emerges. However, methodological differences between the included studies complicate the comparison across studies, which emphasize the need for validation and standardization in brain structure-function studies.
Keywords
CORTICAL CONNECTOME RECONSTRUCTION, DIFFUSION MRI TRACTOGRAPHY, WHITE-MATTER, DEFAULT-MODE, MOUSE-BRAIN, GRANGER CAUSALITY, ANALYTIC, MEASURES, RESTING-BRAIN, RICH CLUB, STATE, Brain, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, functional magnetic, resonance imaging, network connectivity, neuronal tract-tracers

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MLA
Straathof, Milou, et al. “A Systematic Review on the Quantitative Relationship between Structural and Functional Network Connectivity Strength in Mammalian Brains.” JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM, vol. 39, no. 2, Sage Publications Inc, 2019, pp. 189–209.
APA
Straathof, M., Sinke, M. R. T., Dijkhuizen, R. M., Otte, W. M., Buitelaar, J., de Ruiter, S., … Florea, I. (2019). A systematic review on the quantitative relationship between structural and functional network connectivity strength in mammalian brains. JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM, 39(2), 189–209.
Chicago author-date
Straathof, Milou, Michel R. T. Sinke, Rick M. Dijkhuizen, Willem M. Otte, Jan Buitelaar, Saskia de Ruiter, Jilly Naaijen, et al. 2019. “A Systematic Review on the Quantitative Relationship between Structural and Functional Network Connectivity Strength in Mammalian Brains.” JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM 39 (2): 189–209.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Straathof, Milou, Michel R. T. Sinke, Rick M. Dijkhuizen, Willem M. Otte, Jan Buitelaar, Saskia de Ruiter, Jilly Naaijen, Sophie Akkermans, Maarten Mennes, Marcel Zwiers, Shahrzad Ilbegi, Leonie Hennissen, Jeffrey Glennon, Ilse van de Vondervoort, Katarzyna Kapusta, Natalia Bielczyk, Houshang Amiri, Martha Havenith, Barbara Franke, Geert Poelmans, Janita Bralten, Tom Heskes, Elena Sokolova, Perry Groot, Steven Williams, Declan Murphy, David Lythgoe, Muriel Bruchhage, Iulia Dud, Bogdan Voinescu, Ralf Dittmann, Tobias Banaschewski, Daniel Brandeis, Konstantin Mechler, Ruth Berg, Isabella Wolf, Alexander Haege, Michael Landauer, Sarah Hohmann, Regina Boecker-Schlier, Matthias Ruff, Rick Dijkhuizen, Erwin Blezer, Milou Straathof, Kajo van der Marel, Pim Pullens, Wouter Mol, Annette van der Toorn, Willem Otte, Caroline van Heijningen, Sarah Durston, Vincent Mensen, Bob Oranje, Rene Mandl, Daphna Joel, John Cryan, Tracey Petryshen, David Pauls, Mai Saito, Angelique Heckman, Sabine Bahn, Ameli Schwalber, and Ioana Florea. 2019. “A Systematic Review on the Quantitative Relationship between Structural and Functional Network Connectivity Strength in Mammalian Brains.” JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM 39 (2): 189–209.
Vancouver
1.
Straathof M, Sinke MRT, Dijkhuizen RM, Otte WM, Buitelaar J, de Ruiter S, et al. A systematic review on the quantitative relationship between structural and functional network connectivity strength in mammalian brains. JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM. 2019;39(2):189–209.
IEEE
[1]
M. Straathof et al., “A systematic review on the quantitative relationship between structural and functional network connectivity strength in mammalian brains,” JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 189–209, 2019.
@article{8632121,
  abstract     = {The mammalian brain is composed of densely connected and interacting regions, which form structural and functional networks. An improved understanding of the structure-function relation is crucial to understand the structural underpinnings of brain function and brain plasticity after injury. It is currently unclear how functional connectivity strength relates to structural connectivity strength. We obtained an overview of recent papers that report on correspondences between quantitative functional and structural connectivity measures in the mammalian brain. We included network studies in which functional connectivity was measured with resting-state fMRI, and structural connectivity with either diffusion-weighted MRI or neuronal tract tracers. Twenty-seven of the 28 included studies showed a positive structure-function relationship. Large inter-study variations were found comparing functional connectivity strength with either quantitative diffusion-based (correlation coefficient (r) ranges: 0.18-0.82) or neuronal tracer-based structural connectivity measures (r = 0.24-0.74). Two functional datasets demonstrated lower structure-function correlations with neuronal tracer-based (r = 0.22 and r = 0.30) than with diffusion-based measures (r = 0.49 and r = 0.65). The robust positive quantitative structure-function relationship supports the hypothesis that structural connectivity provides the hardware from which functional connectivity emerges. However, methodological differences between the included studies complicate the comparison across studies, which emphasize the need for validation and standardization in brain structure-function studies.},
  author       = {Straathof, Milou and Sinke, Michel R. T. and Dijkhuizen, Rick M. and Otte, Willem M. and Buitelaar, Jan and de Ruiter, Saskia and Naaijen, Jilly and Akkermans, Sophie and Mennes, Maarten and Zwiers, Marcel and Ilbegi, Shahrzad and Hennissen, Leonie and Glennon, Jeffrey and van de Vondervoort, Ilse and Kapusta, Katarzyna and Bielczyk, Natalia and Amiri, Houshang and Havenith, Martha and Franke, Barbara and Poelmans, Geert and Bralten, Janita and Heskes, Tom and Sokolova, Elena and Groot, Perry and Williams, Steven and Murphy, Declan and Lythgoe, David and Bruchhage, Muriel and Dud, Iulia and Voinescu, Bogdan and Dittmann, Ralf and Banaschewski, Tobias and Brandeis, Daniel and Mechler, Konstantin and Berg, Ruth and Wolf, Isabella and Haege, Alexander and Landauer, Michael and Hohmann, Sarah and Boecker-Schlier, Regina and Ruff, Matthias and Dijkhuizen, Rick and Blezer, Erwin and Straathof, Milou and van der Marel, Kajo and Pullens, Pim and Mol, Wouter and van der Toorn, Annette and Otte, Willem and van Heijningen, Caroline and Durston, Sarah and Mensen, Vincent and Oranje, Bob and Mandl, Rene and Joel, Daphna and Cryan, John and Petryshen, Tracey and Pauls, David and Saito, Mai and Heckman, Angelique and Bahn, Sabine and Schwalber, Ameli and Florea, Ioana},
  issn         = {0271-678X},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM},
  keywords     = {CORTICAL CONNECTOME RECONSTRUCTION,DIFFUSION MRI TRACTOGRAPHY,WHITE-MATTER,DEFAULT-MODE,MOUSE-BRAIN,GRANGER CAUSALITY,ANALYTIC,MEASURES,RESTING-BRAIN,RICH CLUB,STATE,Brain,diffusion magnetic resonance imaging,functional magnetic,resonance imaging,network connectivity,neuronal tract-tracers},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {189--209},
  publisher    = {Sage Publications Inc},
  title        = {A systematic review on the quantitative relationship between structural and functional network connectivity strength in mammalian brains},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0271678X18809547},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2019},
}

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