Advanced search
2 files | 644.18 KB Add to list

‘Age of Lovecraft’?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative

Gry Ulstein (UGent)
(2019) NORDLIT. p.47-66
Author
Organization
Project
  • NARMESH (Narrating the Mesh: Ecology and the Non-Human in Contemporary Fiction and Oral Storytelling (NARMESH))
Abstract
This paper considers whether the twenty-first-century resurgence of H. P. Lovecraft and weird fiction can be read as a conceptual parallel to the Anthropocene epoch, taking Carl H. Sederholm and Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock’s The Age of Lovecraftas a starting-point. The assumption is that the two ‘ages’ are historically and thematically linked through the ‘monsters’ that inhabit them; monsters that include—but are not limited to—extensions, reproductions, and evolutions of Lovecraft’swritings. Preoccupied with environmental issues such as global climate change, the twenty-first-century imaginary has conjured monsters that appear to have much in common with early twentieth-century cosmic horror stories. Considering the renewed interest in Lovecraft and the weird, such developments raise the question: what can (weird) monsters tell us about the Anthropocene moment? This paper maps the ‘monstrous’ in the discourses emerging from the Anthropocene epoch and ‘The Age of Lovecraft’ by considering (new) weird narratives fromcontemporary literature, graphic novels, film, TV, and video games. Mindful of on-going discussions within ecocriticism, philosophy, and critical theory, the paper discusses a handful of unconventional texts to investigate the potential of the weird for expressing Anthropocene anxieties and for approaching nonhuman realities from new angles.
Keywords
Anthropocene, ecology, cosmic horror, Lovecraft, new weird.

Downloads

  • (...).docx
    • full text (Accepted manuscript)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • Word
    • |
    • 116.18 KB
  • document.pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 528.01 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Ulstein, Gry. “‘Age of Lovecraft’?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative.” NORDLIT, no. 42, 2019, pp. 47–66.
APA
Ulstein, G. (2019). “Age of Lovecraft”?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative. NORDLIT, (42), 47–66.
Chicago author-date
Ulstein, Gry. 2019. “‘Age of Lovecraft’?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative.” NORDLIT, no. 42: 47–66.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Ulstein, Gry. 2019. “‘Age of Lovecraft’?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative.” NORDLIT (42): 47–66.
Vancouver
1.
Ulstein G. “Age of Lovecraft”?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative. NORDLIT. 2019;(42):47–66.
IEEE
[1]
G. Ulstein, “‘Age of Lovecraft’?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative,” NORDLIT, no. 42, pp. 47–66, 2019.
@article{8627000,
  abstract     = {This paper  considers  whether  the  twenty-first-century  resurgence  of  H.  P. Lovecraft  and  weird  fiction  can  be  read  as  a  conceptual  parallel  to  the  Anthropocene epoch, taking Carl H. Sederholm and Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock’s The Age of Lovecraftas  a  starting-point.  The  assumption is  that  the  two  ‘ages’  are  historically  and thematically  linked  through  the  ‘monsters’  that  inhabit  them;  monsters  that  include—but   are   not   limited   to—extensions,   reproductions,   and   evolutions   of   Lovecraft’swritings.  Preoccupied  with  environmental  issues  such  as  global  climate  change,  the twenty-first-century  imaginary  has  conjured  monsters  that  appear  to  have  much  in common  with  early  twentieth-century  cosmic  horror  stories.  Considering  the  renewed interest  in  Lovecraft  and  the  weird,  such  developments  raise  the  question:  what  can (weird)  monsters  tell  us  about  the  Anthropocene  moment?  This  paper  maps  the ‘monstrous’ in the discourses emerging from the Anthropocene epoch and ‘The Age of Lovecraft’ by considering (new) weird narratives fromcontemporary literature, graphic novels, film, TV, and video games. Mindful of on-going discussions within ecocriticism, philosophy, and critical theory, the paper discusses a handful of unconventional texts to investigate  the  potential  of  the  weird  for  expressing  Anthropocene  anxieties  and  for approaching nonhuman realities from new angles.},
  author       = {Ulstein, Gry},
  issn         = {1503-2086},
  journal      = {NORDLIT},
  keywords     = {Anthropocene,ecology,cosmic horror,Lovecraft,new weird.},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {42},
  pages        = {47--66},
  title        = {‘Age of Lovecraft’?— Anthropocene Monsters in (New) Weird Narrative},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7557/13.5004},
  year         = {2019},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric