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Confidence predicts speed-accuracy tradeoff for subsequent decisions

(2019) ELIFE. 8.
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Abstract
When external feedback about decision outcomes is lacking, agents need to adapt their decision policies based on an internal estimate of the correctness of their choices (i.e., decision confidence). We hypothesized that agents use confidence to continuously update the tradeoff between the speed and accuracy of their decisions: When confidence is low in one decision, the agent needs more evidence before committing to a choice in the next decision, leading to slower but more accurate decisions. We tested this hypothesis by fitting a bounded accumulation decision model to behavioral data from three different perceptual choice tasks. Decision bounds indeed depended on the reported confidence on the previous trial, independent of objective accuracy. This increase in decision bound was predicted by a centro-parietal EEG component sensitive to confidence. We conclude that internally computed neural signals of confidence predict the ongoing adjustment of decision policies.</jats:p>
Keywords
General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Immunology and Microbiology, General Neuroscience, General Medicine, ERROR-DETECTION, COGNITIVE CONTROL, NEURAL BASIS, CHOICE, TIME, THETA, COMPUTATION, INTEGRATION, MECHANISMS, CERTAINTY

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Desender, Kobe, et al. “Confidence Predicts Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff for Subsequent Decisions.” ELIFE, vol. 8, 2019.
APA
Desender, K., Boldt, A., Verguts, T., & Donner, T. H. (2019). Confidence predicts speed-accuracy tradeoff for subsequent decisions. ELIFE, 8.
Chicago author-date
Desender, Kobe, Annika Boldt, Tom Verguts, and Tobias H Donner. 2019. “Confidence Predicts Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff for Subsequent Decisions.” ELIFE 8.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Desender, Kobe, Annika Boldt, Tom Verguts, and Tobias H Donner. 2019. “Confidence Predicts Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff for Subsequent Decisions.” ELIFE 8.
Vancouver
1.
Desender K, Boldt A, Verguts T, Donner TH. Confidence predicts speed-accuracy tradeoff for subsequent decisions. ELIFE. 2019;8.
IEEE
[1]
K. Desender, A. Boldt, T. Verguts, and T. H. Donner, “Confidence predicts speed-accuracy tradeoff for subsequent decisions,” ELIFE, vol. 8, 2019.
@article{8626341,
  abstract     = {When external feedback about decision outcomes is lacking, agents need to adapt their decision policies based on an internal estimate of the correctness of their choices (i.e., decision confidence). We hypothesized that agents use confidence to continuously update the tradeoff between the speed and accuracy of their decisions: When confidence is low in one decision, the agent needs more evidence before committing to a choice in the next decision, leading to slower but more accurate decisions. We tested this hypothesis by fitting a bounded accumulation decision model to behavioral data from three different perceptual choice tasks. Decision bounds indeed depended on the reported confidence on the previous trial, independent of objective accuracy. This increase in decision bound was predicted by a centro-parietal EEG component sensitive to confidence. We conclude that internally computed neural signals of confidence predict the ongoing adjustment of decision policies.</jats:p>},
  articleno    = {e43499},
  author       = {Desender, Kobe and Boldt, Annika and Verguts, Tom and Donner, Tobias H},
  issn         = {2050-084X},
  journal      = {ELIFE},
  keywords     = {General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology,General Immunology and Microbiology,General Neuroscience,General Medicine,ERROR-DETECTION,COGNITIVE CONTROL,NEURAL BASIS,CHOICE,TIME,THETA,COMPUTATION,INTEGRATION,MECHANISMS,CERTAINTY},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Confidence predicts speed-accuracy tradeoff for subsequent decisions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/elife.43499},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2019},
}

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