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Membership revisited : negotiating migration regulation and access to welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders

(2019)
Author
Promoter
Anne Winter and (UGent)
Organization
Abstract
Cities and rural districts in West Flanders (Southern Low Countries) and Maritime Flanders (France) collaborated in the eighteenth century regarding the belonging of the poor. They created the Concordat of Ypres in 1750, which advocated free mobility and stated that access to poor relief was located in the birthplace. Migrants were thus to be removed upon becoming poor. The Concordat functions as case study in this thesis to assess the relations between welfare and mobility. The analysis of the larger coastal Flanders area provides new insights into the mostly anglocentric historiography of settlement, out-parish relief and removal. It lays bare the importance of the border, especially in the struggle for transnational reciprocity and the mutual influences and exchange of ideas between cities and rural regions in France and the Southern Low Countries. The multilateral Concordat offers an excellent case study of the practices and negotiations of local communities in dealing with poverty and mobility, focussing on rural-urban relations as well as discrepancies between different levels of local and more central authorities.
Keywords
Migration, Poor Relief, Eighteenth Century, France, Southern Low Countries, rural history, urban history

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Schepers, Marjolein. “Membership Revisited : Negotiating Migration Regulation and Access to Welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders.” 2019 : n. pag. Print.
APA
Schepers, M. (2019). Membership revisited : negotiating migration regulation and access to welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders.
Chicago author-date
Schepers, Marjolein. 2019. “Membership Revisited : Negotiating Migration Regulation and Access to Welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders.”
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Schepers, Marjolein. 2019. “Membership Revisited : Negotiating Migration Regulation and Access to Welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders.”
Vancouver
1.
Schepers M. Membership revisited : negotiating migration regulation and access to welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders. 2019.
IEEE
[1]
M. Schepers, “Membership revisited : negotiating migration regulation and access to welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders,” 2019.
@phdthesis{8625286,
  abstract     = {Cities and rural districts in West Flanders (Southern Low Countries) and Maritime Flanders (France) collaborated in the eighteenth century regarding the belonging of the poor. They created the Concordat of Ypres in 1750, which advocated free mobility and stated that access to poor relief was located in the birthplace. Migrants were thus to be removed upon becoming poor. The Concordat functions as case study in this thesis to assess the relations between welfare and mobility. The analysis of the larger coastal Flanders area provides new insights into the mostly anglocentric historiography of settlement, out-parish relief and removal. It lays bare the importance of the border, especially in the struggle for transnational reciprocity and the mutual influences and exchange of ideas between cities and rural regions in France and the Southern Low Countries. The multilateral Concordat offers an excellent case study of the practices and negotiations of local communities in dealing with poverty and mobility, focussing on rural-urban relations as well as discrepancies between different levels of local and more central authorities.},
  author       = {Schepers, Marjolein},
  keywords     = {Migration,Poor Relief,Eighteenth Century,France,Southern Low Countries,rural history,urban history},
  language     = {eng},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Membership revisited : negotiating migration regulation and access to welfare in Eighteenth-Century Flanders},
  year         = {2019},
}