Advanced search
1 file | 524.28 KB Add to list

Advanced diffusion imaging in the hippocampus of rats with mild traumatic brain injury

Kim Braeckman (UGent) , Benedicte Descamps (UGent) and Christian Vanhove (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is the most common type of acquired brain injury. Since patients with traumatic brain injury show a tremendous variability and heterogeneity (age, gender, type of trauma, other possible pathologies, etc.), animal models play a key role in unraveling factors that are limitations in clinical research. They provide a standardized and controlled setting to investigate the biological mechanisms of injury and repair following TBI. However, not all animal models mimic the diffuse and subtle nature of mTBI effectively. For example, the commonly used controlled cortical impact (CCI) and lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI) models make use of a craniotomy to expose the brain and induce widespread focal trauma, which are not commonly seen in mTBI. Therefore, these experimental models are not valid to mimic mTBI. Thus, an appropriate model should be used to investigate mTBI. The Marmarou weight drop model for rats induces similar microstructurel alterations and cognitive impairments as seen in patients who sustain mild trauma; therefore, this model was selected for this protocol. Conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans commonly show no damage following a mild injury, because mTBI induces often only subtle and diffuse injuries. With diffusion weighted MRI, it is possible to investigate microstructurel properties of brain tissue, which can provide more insight into the microscopic alterations following mild trauma. Therefore, the goal of this study is to obtain quantitative information of a selected region-of-interest (i.e., hippocampus) to follow up disease progression after obtaining a mild and diffuse brain injury.
Keywords
Neuroscience, Issue 150, traumatic brain injury, agnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, preclinical, rat, hippocampus

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 524.28 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Braeckman, Kim, et al. “Advanced Diffusion Imaging in the Hippocampus of Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.” JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS, no. 150, 2019.
APA
Braeckman, K., Descamps, B., & Vanhove, C. (2019). Advanced diffusion imaging in the hippocampus of rats with mild traumatic brain injury. JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS, (150).
Chicago author-date
Braeckman, Kim, Benedicte Descamps, and Christian Vanhove. 2019. “Advanced Diffusion Imaging in the Hippocampus of Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.” JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS, no. 150.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Braeckman, Kim, Benedicte Descamps, and Christian Vanhove. 2019. “Advanced Diffusion Imaging in the Hippocampus of Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.” JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS (150).
Vancouver
1.
Braeckman K, Descamps B, Vanhove C. Advanced diffusion imaging in the hippocampus of rats with mild traumatic brain injury. JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS. 2019;(150).
IEEE
[1]
K. Braeckman, B. Descamps, and C. Vanhove, “Advanced diffusion imaging in the hippocampus of rats with mild traumatic brain injury,” JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS, no. 150, 2019.
@article{8625203,
  abstract     = {Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is the most common type of acquired brain injury. Since patients with traumatic brain injury show a tremendous variability and heterogeneity (age, gender, type of trauma, other possible pathologies, etc.), animal models play a key role in unraveling factors that are limitations in clinical research. They provide a standardized and controlled setting to investigate the biological mechanisms of injury and repair following TBI. However, not all animal models mimic the diffuse and subtle nature of mTBI effectively. For example, the commonly used controlled cortical impact (CCI) and lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI) models make use of a craniotomy to expose the brain and induce widespread focal trauma, which are not commonly seen in mTBI. Therefore, these experimental models are not valid to mimic mTBI. Thus, an appropriate model should be used to investigate mTBI. The Marmarou weight drop model for rats induces similar microstructurel alterations and cognitive impairments as seen in patients who sustain mild trauma; therefore, this model was selected for this protocol. Conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans commonly show no damage following a mild injury, because mTBI induces often only subtle and diffuse injuries. With diffusion weighted MRI, it is possible to investigate microstructurel properties of brain tissue, which can provide more insight into the microscopic alterations following mild trauma. Therefore, the goal of this study is to obtain quantitative information of a selected region-of-interest (i.e., hippocampus) to follow up disease progression after obtaining a mild and diffuse brain injury.},
  articleno    = {e60012},
  author       = {Braeckman, Kim and Descamps, Benedicte and Vanhove, Christian},
  issn         = {1940-087X},
  journal      = {JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS},
  keywords     = {Neuroscience,Issue 150,traumatic brain injury,agnetic resonance imaging,diffusion tensor imaging,preclinical,rat,hippocampus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {150},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {Advanced diffusion imaging in the hippocampus of rats with mild traumatic brain injury},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/60012},
  year         = {2019},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: