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Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study.

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Abstract
Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study. Background: Providing care for cancer patients mostly relies on a family caregiver, often the partner.1 Being confronted with the patient’s incurable cancer diagnosis, can be highly disruptive.2 However, the majority of caregivers seem to adapt well and report feeling relatively healthy.3 Positive psychologists have linked this stable trajectory of healthy functioning to the phenomenon of ‘resilience’.4, 5 In this study, resilience is considered a dynamic process resulting from the interplay between intrinsic competences, contextual risks, and protective factors.6 A resilience trajectory is initiated by a potentially traumatic event (PTE)6 and is characterized by a temporary disruption of daily functioning and elevated psychological symptoms followed by a returning to a healthy equilibrium.7 Other well-known prototypical trajectories after PTE are chronic depression, delayed response, post-traumatic growth (PTG), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).8, 9 However, it is not known which trajectories could be identified in caregivers of advanced cancer patients. Recently we conducted a qualitative study to explore what makes caregiving for a partner diagnosed with advanced cancer a resilient process. The preliminary results reveal some important resources linked to resilience: e.g. caregiver competences; contextual and economic resources. Yet, we don’t know whether these resources are predictors of a resilient trajectory or not. Research questions: 1. What different response trajectories to the partner’s diagnosis of an incurable cancer can be identified during the caregiving period? 2. Are the resources we linked to resilience, predictors of a resilient trajectory? Proposed methodology: A longitudinal study using Latent Growth Modeling (LGM) techniques. Depressive symptoms, PTG, PTSD will be measured within one month following the partner’s diagnosis and at 3, 6 ,12, 24 months, and 3 months after the partner’s death. Trait resilience, context support, and economic resources will be measured as covariates to be modelled as predictors of the emergent longitudinal patterns.
Keywords
Resilience, caregiver, advanced cancer, primary care, longitudinal study

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Opsomer, Sophie, and Jan De Lepeleire. 2018. “Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study.” In , ed. Claire Collins, 49. Ireland: Colofon.
APA
Opsomer, S., & De Lepeleire, J. (2018). Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study. In C. Collins (Ed.), (p. 49). Presented at the 87th EGPRN Meeting, Ireland: Colofon.
Vancouver
1.
Opsomer S, De Lepeleire J. Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study. In: Collins C, editor. Ireland: Colofon; 2018. p. 49.
MLA
Opsomer, Sophie, and Jan De Lepeleire. “Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study.” Ed. Claire Collins. Ireland: Colofon, 2018. 49. Print.
@inproceedings{8625147,
  abstract     = {Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study.

Background:
Providing care for cancer patients mostly relies on a family caregiver, often the partner.1 Being confronted with the patient’s incurable cancer diagnosis, can be highly disruptive.2 However, the majority of caregivers seem to adapt well and report feeling relatively healthy.3 Positive psychologists have linked this stable trajectory of healthy functioning to the phenomenon of ‘resilience’.4, 5 In this study, resilience is considered a dynamic process resulting from the interplay between intrinsic competences, contextual risks, and protective factors.6 
A resilience trajectory is initiated by a potentially traumatic event (PTE)6 and is characterized by a temporary disruption of daily functioning and elevated psychological symptoms followed by a returning to a healthy equilibrium.7 Other well-known prototypical trajectories after PTE are chronic depression, delayed response, post-traumatic growth (PTG), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).8, 9 However, it is not known which trajectories could be identified in caregivers of advanced cancer patients. Recently we conducted a qualitative study to explore what makes caregiving for a partner diagnosed with advanced cancer a resilient process. The preliminary results reveal some important resources linked to resilience: e.g. caregiver competences; contextual and economic resources. Yet, we don’t know whether these resources are predictors of a resilient trajectory or not.

Research questions: 
1.	What different response trajectories to the partner’s diagnosis of an incurable cancer can be identified during the caregiving period?
2.	Are the resources we linked to resilience, predictors of a resilient trajectory?

Proposed methodology:
A longitudinal study using Latent Growth Modeling (LGM) techniques.
Depressive symptoms, PTG, PTSD will be measured within one month following the partner’s diagnosis and at 3, 6 ,12, 24 months, and 3 months after the partner’s death.
Trait resilience, context support, and economic resources will be measured as covariates to be modelled as predictors of the emergent longitudinal patterns.
},
  author       = {Opsomer, Sophie and De Lepeleire, Jan},
  editor       = {Collins, Claire},
  isbn         = {978-90-829673-1-9},
  keywords     = {Resilience,caregiver,advanced cancer,primary care,longitudinal study},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Sarajevo-Bosnia and Herzegovina},
  pages        = {74},
  publisher    = {Colofon},
  title        = {Informal Caregiver Resilience to the Partner’s Advanced Cancer Diagnosis: A Longitudinal Study.},
  year         = {2018},
}