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Harpacticoid copepods in risk assessment - Combining life cycle experiments with population modeling

Josef Koch (UGent) , Colin Janssen (UGent) and Karel De Schamphelaere (UGent)
(2017)
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Abstract
While acute and chronic toxicity tests on the individual level are usually performed as a first step to assess chemical toxicity in environmental risk assessment (ERA), the protection goal in ERA is the population and community level. Combining life cycle experiments with population modeling can be a cost effective and powerful approach to extrapolate from individuals to populations. Population models based on dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory have been successfully applied to analyse stressor effects in terms of their energetic modes of action (MoA) on various invertebrate species in the past. These models can also be used to make predictions on population dynamics at scenarios of varying environmental conditions and toxic stress. Over the past few decades, copepods have gained increasing popularity as invertebrate model organisms in ecotoxicology. As most crustaceans, they undergo sexual reproduction and thus form a welcome alternative to the still more commonly used parthenogenic Daphnia. Harpacticoid copepods form an important trophic link between the microphytobenthos in the sediments and higher trophic levels and thus are of high relevance for aquatic ecosystems. Unfortunately, only few attempts have been made to parameterise a DEB model for (harpacticoid) copepods due to some characteristic life cycle peculiarities that distinguish copepods from most other animals. In this study, the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes was chosen as a model species. In an individual based modelling approach (IBM) the DEBkiss model was used to build a mechanistic population model for this species. Slight modifications to the generic model structure were made to account for specific assumptions that were made for the copepod life cycle. These include a change in shape during the moult between the sixth naupliar and the first copepodite stage as well as an abrupt stop in growth after reaching the adult stage. The model was parameterised on life cycle data from literature and additional experiments. Using data on growth and reproduction over time at different temperatures and food concentrations we were able to predict ingestion and respiration rates. Furthermore, full life cycle experiments were performed with the antidepressant citalopram. The DEBkiss IBM was used to analyse this drug’s toxic MoA on N. spinipes.

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Koch, Josef, Colin Janssen, and Karel De Schamphelaere. 2017. “Harpacticoid Copepods in Risk Assessment - Combining Life Cycle Experiments with Population Modeling.” In .
APA
Koch, J., Janssen, C., & De Schamphelaere, K. (2017). Harpacticoid copepods in risk assessment - Combining life cycle experiments with population modeling. Presented at the SETAC Europe 27th Annual Meeting.
Vancouver
1.
Koch J, Janssen C, De Schamphelaere K. Harpacticoid copepods in risk assessment - Combining life cycle experiments with population modeling. 2017.
MLA
Koch, Josef, Colin Janssen, and Karel De Schamphelaere. “Harpacticoid Copepods in Risk Assessment - Combining Life Cycle Experiments with Population Modeling.” 2017. Print.
@inproceedings{8625067,
  abstract     = {While acute and chronic toxicity tests on the individual level are usually performed as a first step to assess chemical toxicity in environmental risk assessment (ERA), the protection goal in ERA is the population and community level. Combining life cycle experiments with population modeling can be a cost effective and powerful approach to extrapolate from individuals to populations. Population models based on dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory have been successfully applied to analyse stressor effects in terms of their energetic modes of action (MoA) on various invertebrate species in the past. These models can also be used to make predictions on population dynamics at scenarios of varying environmental conditions and toxic stress. Over the past few decades, copepods have gained increasing popularity as invertebrate model organisms in ecotoxicology. As most crustaceans, they undergo sexual reproduction and thus form a welcome alternative to the still more commonly used parthenogenic Daphnia. Harpacticoid copepods form an important trophic link between the microphytobenthos in the sediments and higher trophic levels and thus are of high relevance for aquatic ecosystems. Unfortunately, only few attempts have been made to parameterise a DEB model for (harpacticoid) copepods due to some characteristic life cycle peculiarities that distinguish copepods from most other animals. In this study, the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes was chosen as a model species. In an individual based modelling approach (IBM) the DEBkiss model was used to build a mechanistic population model for this species. Slight modifications to the generic model structure were made to account for specific assumptions that were made for the copepod life cycle. These include a change in shape during the moult between the sixth naupliar and the first copepodite stage as well as an abrupt stop in growth after reaching the adult stage. The model was parameterised on life cycle data from literature and additional experiments. Using data on growth and reproduction over time at different temperatures and food concentrations we were able to predict ingestion and respiration rates. Furthermore, full life cycle experiments were performed with the antidepressant citalopram. The DEBkiss IBM was used to analyse this drug’s toxic MoA on N. spinipes.},
  author       = {Koch, Josef and Janssen, Colin and De Schamphelaere, Karel},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brussels},
  title        = {Harpacticoid copepods in risk assessment - Combining life cycle experiments with population modeling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.28489.13920},
  year         = {2017},
}

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