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Using episodic future thinking to pre-experience climate change increases pro-environmental behavior

(2020) ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR. 52(1). p.60-81
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Abstract
Research has found that many people view climate change as a psychologically distant, future threat, which leads them to be less motivated to engage in pro-environmental behavior. Engaging in episodic future thinking (EFT; projecting the self into the future to pre-experience future events) may facilitate the perception of future events as psychologically close, thereby increasing the perceived risk associated with those events. Therefore, engagement in EFT regarding climate change–related risks should induce higher risk perceptions and lead to acting pro-environmentally. In two experiments, we demonstrated that engaging in EFT to pre-experience climate change–related risk events was associated with a higher level of risk perception and a greater tendency toward pro-environmental behavior, including energy-saving use of air-conditioning (Experiment 1), willingness to participate in beach cleaning (Experiment 2), and choice of a meal with lower environmental impact (Experiment 2). The current research provides experimental evidence for an innovative approach to improving public engagement with climate change.
Keywords
climate change, episodic future thinking, pro-environmental behavior, psychological distance, risk perception, CHANGE RISK PERCEPTION, IMPLEMENTATION INTENTIONS, PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTANCE, PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT, IDEAL SELF, BARRIERS, MITIGATION, LIKELIHOOD, TENDENCY, BELIEFS

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MLA
Lee, Pei-Shan, et al. “Using Episodic Future Thinking to Pre-Experience Climate Change Increases pro-Environmental Behavior.” ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR, vol. 52, no. 1, 2020, pp. 60–81.
APA
Lee, P.-S., Sung, Y.-H., Wu, C.-C., Ho, L.-C., & Chiou, W.-B. (2020). Using episodic future thinking to pre-experience climate change increases pro-environmental behavior. ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR, 52(1), 60–81.
Chicago author-date
Lee, Pei-Shan, Yu-Hsien Sung, Chia-Chun Wu, Liang-Chu Ho, and Wen-Bin Chiou. 2020. “Using Episodic Future Thinking to Pre-Experience Climate Change Increases pro-Environmental Behavior.” ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR 52 (1): 60–81.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lee, Pei-Shan, Yu-Hsien Sung, Chia-Chun Wu, Liang-Chu Ho, and Wen-Bin Chiou. 2020. “Using Episodic Future Thinking to Pre-Experience Climate Change Increases pro-Environmental Behavior.” ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR 52 (1): 60–81.
Vancouver
1.
Lee P-S, Sung Y-H, Wu C-C, Ho L-C, Chiou W-B. Using episodic future thinking to pre-experience climate change increases pro-environmental behavior. ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR. 2020;52(1):60–81.
IEEE
[1]
P.-S. Lee, Y.-H. Sung, C.-C. Wu, L.-C. Ho, and W.-B. Chiou, “Using episodic future thinking to pre-experience climate change increases pro-environmental behavior,” ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 60–81, 2020.
@article{8624569,
  abstract     = {{Research has found that many people view climate change as a psychologically distant, future threat, which leads them to be less motivated to engage in pro-environmental behavior. Engaging in episodic future thinking (EFT; projecting the self into the future to pre-experience future events) may facilitate the perception of future events as psychologically close, thereby increasing the perceived risk associated with those events. Therefore, engagement in EFT regarding climate change–related risks should induce higher risk perceptions and lead to acting pro-environmentally. In two experiments, we demonstrated that engaging in EFT to pre-experience climate change–related risk events was associated with a higher level of risk perception and a greater tendency toward pro-environmental behavior, including energy-saving use of air-conditioning (Experiment 1), willingness to participate in beach cleaning (Experiment 2), and choice of a meal with lower environmental impact (Experiment 2). The current research provides experimental evidence for an innovative approach to improving public engagement with climate change.}},
  author       = {{Lee, Pei-Shan and Sung, Yu-Hsien and Wu, Chia-Chun and Ho, Liang-Chu and Chiou, Wen-Bin}},
  issn         = {{0013-9165}},
  journal      = {{ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR}},
  keywords     = {{climate change,episodic future thinking,pro-environmental behavior,psychological distance,risk perception,CHANGE RISK PERCEPTION,IMPLEMENTATION INTENTIONS,PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTANCE,PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT,IDEAL SELF,BARRIERS,MITIGATION,LIKELIHOOD,TENDENCY,BELIEFS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{60--81}},
  title        = {{Using episodic future thinking to pre-experience climate change increases pro-environmental behavior}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0013916518790590}},
  volume       = {{52}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}

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