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Test-retest reproducibility of response duration in tinnitus patients with positive residual inhibition

Ann Deklerck (UGent) , Sofie Degeest (UGent) , Ingeborg Dhooge (UGent) and Hannah Keppler (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Purpose: Functional imaging is often used to try to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism of tinnitus. Residual inhibition, the temporary suppression of tinnitus after application of a masking noise, could be an interesting technique to modulate tinnitus perception in functional imaging paradigms. The purposes of this study were to primarily assess reproducibility of the (partial) positive residual inhibition response duration in patients with tinnitus and to explore its utility in experimental designs. Method: Patients with tinnitus exhibiting a (partial) positive residual inhibition response or tinnitus reduction after a 1-min white noise presentation were selected from a broad consulting tinnitus population. In 27 patients, this response was tested 4 times: twice during initial testing and twice during a retest of the psychoacoustic tinnitus measures, 4-8 weeks after initial consultation. In 17 patients with stable residual inhibition responses, reproducibility of response duration, the duration of tinnitus reduction up to pretesting state, was analyzed. Results: Initial testing showed a residual inhibition duration of 29.5 s on average. Test retest reproducibility of response duration was shown to be reliable with an ICC(3, 4) of.871 (95% CI [0.733, 0.948]) and a standard error of measurement of 6.64 s. Conclusions: This study indicates the good test retest reproducibility of residual inhibition duration in our subset of 17 patients with stable (partial) positive residual inhibition. Residual inhibition is, therefore, a technique that can potentially be used for temporary tinnitus manipulation in experimental paradigms to unravel tinnitus pathophysiology.
Keywords
SUBJECTIVE TINNITUS, CLINICAL-PRACTICE, RELIABILITY, PREVALENCE, PITCH, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PERSPECTIVES, NEUROSCIENCE, MODULATION, MECHANISMS

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MLA
Deklerck, Ann, et al. “Test-Retest Reproducibility of Response Duration in Tinnitus Patients with Positive Residual Inhibition.” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 62, no. 9, 2019, pp. 3531–44.
APA
Deklerck, A., Degeest, S., Dhooge, I., & Keppler, H. (2019). Test-retest reproducibility of response duration in tinnitus patients with positive residual inhibition. JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, 62(9), 3531–3544.
Chicago author-date
Deklerck, Ann, Sofie Degeest, Ingeborg Dhooge, and Hannah Keppler. 2019. “Test-Retest Reproducibility of Response Duration in Tinnitus Patients with Positive Residual Inhibition.” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH 62 (9): 3531–44.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Deklerck, Ann, Sofie Degeest, Ingeborg Dhooge, and Hannah Keppler. 2019. “Test-Retest Reproducibility of Response Duration in Tinnitus Patients with Positive Residual Inhibition.” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH 62 (9): 3531–3544.
Vancouver
1.
Deklerck A, Degeest S, Dhooge I, Keppler H. Test-retest reproducibility of response duration in tinnitus patients with positive residual inhibition. JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH. 2019;62(9):3531–44.
IEEE
[1]
A. Deklerck, S. Degeest, I. Dhooge, and H. Keppler, “Test-retest reproducibility of response duration in tinnitus patients with positive residual inhibition,” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 62, no. 9, pp. 3531–3544, 2019.
@article{8624426,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Functional imaging is often used to try to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism of tinnitus. Residual inhibition, the temporary suppression of tinnitus after application of a masking noise, could be an interesting technique to modulate tinnitus perception in functional imaging paradigms. The purposes of this study were to primarily assess reproducibility of the (partial) positive residual inhibition response duration in patients with tinnitus and to explore its utility in experimental designs. 
Method: Patients with tinnitus exhibiting a (partial) positive residual inhibition response or tinnitus reduction after a 1-min white noise presentation were selected from a broad consulting tinnitus population. In 27 patients, this response was tested 4 times: twice during initial testing and twice during a retest of the psychoacoustic tinnitus measures, 4-8 weeks after initial consultation. In 17 patients with stable residual inhibition responses, reproducibility of response duration, the duration of tinnitus reduction up to pretesting state, was analyzed. 
Results: Initial testing showed a residual inhibition duration of 29.5 s on average. Test retest reproducibility of response duration was shown to be reliable with an ICC(3, 4) of.871 (95% CI [0.733, 0.948]) and a standard error of measurement of 6.64 s. 
Conclusions: This study indicates the good test retest reproducibility of residual inhibition duration in our subset of 17 patients with stable (partial) positive residual inhibition. Residual inhibition is, therefore, a technique that can potentially be used for temporary tinnitus manipulation in experimental paradigms to unravel tinnitus pathophysiology.},
  author       = {Deklerck, Ann and Degeest, Sofie and Dhooge, Ingeborg and Keppler, Hannah},
  issn         = {1092-4388},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {SUBJECTIVE TINNITUS,CLINICAL-PRACTICE,RELIABILITY,PREVALENCE,PITCH,EPIDEMIOLOGY,PERSPECTIVES,NEUROSCIENCE,MODULATION,MECHANISMS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {3531--3544},
  title        = {Test-retest reproducibility of response duration in tinnitus patients with positive residual inhibition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2019_JSLHR-H-18-0514},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2019},
}

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