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Are men intimidated by highly educated women? Undercover on Tinder

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Abstract
In this study, we examine the impact of an individual's education level on her/his mating success on the mobile dating app Tinder. To do so, we conducted a field experiment on Tinder in which we collected data on 3,600 profile evaluations. In line with previous research on mating preferences from multiple fields, our results indicate a heterogeneous effect of education level by gender: while women strongly prefer a highly educated potential partner, this hypothesis is rejected for men. In contrast with recent influential studies from the field of economics, we do not find any evidence that men would have an aversion to a highly educated potential partner. Additionally, in contrast with most previous research - again from multiple fields we do not find any evidence for preferences for educational assortative mating, i.e. preferring a partner with a similar education level.
Keywords
Economics and Econometrics, Education, Returns to education, Mating success, Assortative mating, Dating apps, Tinder, MATE PREFERENCES, GENDER-DIFFERENCES, INCOME ATTRACTION, SEX-DIFFERENCES, ONLINE, RETURNS, MARRIAGE, SELECTION, QUALITY, CHOICE

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Neyt, Brecht, et al. “Are Men Intimidated by Highly Educated Women? Undercover on Tinder.” ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW, vol. 73, 2019.
APA
Neyt, B., Vandenbulcke, S., & Baert, S. (2019). Are men intimidated by highly educated women? Undercover on Tinder. ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW, 73.
Chicago author-date
Neyt, Brecht, Sarah Vandenbulcke, and Stijn Baert. 2019. “Are Men Intimidated by Highly Educated Women? Undercover on Tinder.” ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW 73.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Neyt, Brecht, Sarah Vandenbulcke, and Stijn Baert. 2019. “Are Men Intimidated by Highly Educated Women? Undercover on Tinder.” ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW 73.
Vancouver
1.
Neyt B, Vandenbulcke S, Baert S. Are men intimidated by highly educated women? Undercover on Tinder. ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW. 2019;73.
IEEE
[1]
B. Neyt, S. Vandenbulcke, and S. Baert, “Are men intimidated by highly educated women? Undercover on Tinder,” ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW, vol. 73, 2019.
@article{8624022,
  abstract     = {In this study, we examine the impact of an individual's education level on her/his mating success on the mobile dating app Tinder. To do so, we conducted a field experiment on Tinder in which we collected data on 3,600 profile evaluations. In line with previous research on mating preferences from multiple fields, our results indicate a heterogeneous effect of education level by gender: while women strongly prefer a highly educated potential partner, this hypothesis is rejected for men. In contrast with recent influential studies from the field of economics, we do not find any evidence that men would have an aversion to a highly educated potential partner. Additionally, in contrast with most previous research - again from multiple fields we do not find any evidence for preferences for educational assortative mating, i.e. preferring a partner with a similar education level.},
  articleno    = {101914},
  author       = {Neyt, Brecht and Vandenbulcke, Sarah and Baert, Stijn},
  issn         = {0272-7757},
  journal      = {ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW},
  keywords     = {Economics and Econometrics,Education,Returns to education,Mating success,Assortative mating,Dating apps,Tinder,MATE PREFERENCES,GENDER-DIFFERENCES,INCOME ATTRACTION,SEX-DIFFERENCES,ONLINE,RETURNS,MARRIAGE,SELECTION,QUALITY,CHOICE},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Are men intimidated by highly educated women? Undercover on Tinder},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2019.101914},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2019},
}

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