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(Photo-)crosslinkable gelatin derivatives for biofabrication applications

(2019) ACTA BIOMATERIALIA. 97. p.46-73
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Abstract
Over the recent decades gelatin has proven to be very suitable as an extracellular matrix mimic for bio-fabrication and tissue engineering applications. However, gelatin is prone to dissolution at typical cell culture conditions and is therefore often chemically modified to introduce (photo-)crosslinkable functionalities. These modifications allow to tune the material properties of gelatin, making it suitable for a wide range of biofabrication techniques both as a bioink and as a biomaterial ink (component). The present review provides a non-exhaustive overview of the different reported gelatin modification strategies to yield crosslinkable materials that can be used to form hydrogels suitable for biofabrication applications. The different crosslinking chemistries are discussed and classified according to their mechanism including chain-growth and step-growth polymerization. The step-growth polymerization mechanisms are further classified based on the specific chemistry including different (photo-)click chemistries and reversible systems. The benefits and drawbacks of each chemistry are also briefly discussed. Furthermore, focus is placed on different biofabrication strategies using either inkjet, deposition or light-based additive manufacturing techniques, and the applications of the obtained 3D constructs.
Keywords
Gelatin derivatives, Crosslinking chemistry, Modification strategies, Additive manufacturing, Biofabrication, ALDER CLICK CHEMISTRY, CROSS-LINKING, IN-VITRO, FUNCTIONALIZED GELATIN, RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES, 2-PHOTON POLYMERIZATION, BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS, EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX, HYDROGELS, FABRICATION

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Citation

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MLA
Van Hoorick, Jasper, et al. “(Photo-)Crosslinkable Gelatin Derivatives for Biofabrication Applications.” ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, vol. 97, 2019, pp. 46–73.
APA
Van Hoorick, J., Tytgat, L., Dobos, A., Ottevaere, H., Van Erps, J., Thienpont, H., … Van Vlierberghe, S. (2019). (Photo-)crosslinkable gelatin derivatives for biofabrication applications. ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, 97, 46–73.
Chicago author-date
Van Hoorick, Jasper, Liesbeth Tytgat, Agnes Dobos, Heidi Ottevaere, Jürgen Van Erps, Hugo Thienpont, Aleksandr Ovsianikov, Peter Dubruel, and Sandra Van Vlierberghe. 2019. “(Photo-)Crosslinkable Gelatin Derivatives for Biofabrication Applications.” ACTA BIOMATERIALIA 97: 46–73.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Hoorick, Jasper, Liesbeth Tytgat, Agnes Dobos, Heidi Ottevaere, Jürgen Van Erps, Hugo Thienpont, Aleksandr Ovsianikov, Peter Dubruel, and Sandra Van Vlierberghe. 2019. “(Photo-)Crosslinkable Gelatin Derivatives for Biofabrication Applications.” ACTA BIOMATERIALIA 97: 46–73.
Vancouver
1.
Van Hoorick J, Tytgat L, Dobos A, Ottevaere H, Van Erps J, Thienpont H, et al. (Photo-)crosslinkable gelatin derivatives for biofabrication applications. ACTA BIOMATERIALIA. 2019;97:46–73.
IEEE
[1]
J. Van Hoorick et al., “(Photo-)crosslinkable gelatin derivatives for biofabrication applications,” ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, vol. 97, pp. 46–73, 2019.
@article{8623953,
  abstract     = {Over the recent decades gelatin has proven to be very suitable as an extracellular matrix mimic for bio-fabrication and tissue engineering applications. However, gelatin is prone to dissolution at typical cell culture conditions and is therefore often chemically modified to introduce (photo-)crosslinkable functionalities. These modifications allow to tune the material properties of gelatin, making it suitable for a wide range of biofabrication techniques both as a bioink and as a biomaterial ink (component). The present review provides a non-exhaustive overview of the different reported gelatin modification strategies to yield crosslinkable materials that can be used to form hydrogels suitable for biofabrication applications. The different crosslinking chemistries are discussed and classified according to their mechanism including chain-growth and step-growth polymerization. The step-growth polymerization mechanisms are further classified based on the specific chemistry including different (photo-)click chemistries and reversible systems. The benefits and drawbacks of each chemistry are also briefly discussed. Furthermore, focus is placed on different biofabrication strategies using either inkjet, deposition or light-based additive manufacturing techniques, and the applications of the obtained 3D constructs.},
  author       = {Van Hoorick, Jasper and Tytgat, Liesbeth and Dobos, Agnes and Ottevaere, Heidi and Van Erps, Jürgen and Thienpont, Hugo and Ovsianikov, Aleksandr and Dubruel, Peter and Van Vlierberghe, Sandra},
  issn         = {1742-7061},
  journal      = {ACTA BIOMATERIALIA},
  keywords     = {Gelatin derivatives,Crosslinking chemistry,Modification strategies,Additive manufacturing,Biofabrication,ALDER CLICK CHEMISTRY,CROSS-LINKING,IN-VITRO,FUNCTIONALIZED GELATIN,RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES,2-PHOTON POLYMERIZATION,BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS,EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX,HYDROGELS,FABRICATION},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {46--73},
  title        = {(Photo-)crosslinkable gelatin derivatives for biofabrication applications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2019.07.035},
  volume       = {97},
  year         = {2019},
}

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