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Detecting carotid stenosis from skin vibrations using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an in-vitro proof-of-concept

(2019) PLOS ONE. 14(6).
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Abstract
Early detection of asymptomatic carotid stenosis may help identifying individuals at risk of stroke. We explore a new method based on laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) which could allow the non-contact detection of stenosis from neck skin vibrations due to stenosisinduced flow disturbances. Experimental fluid dynamical tests were performed with water on a severely stenosed patient-specific carotid bifurcation model. Measurements were taken under various physiological flow regimes both in a compliant and stiff-walled version of the model, at 1 to 4 diameters downstream from the stenosis. An inter-arterial pressure catheter was positioned as reference. Increasing flow led to corresponding increase in power spectral density (PSD) of pressure and LDV recordings in the 0–500 Hz range. The stiff model lead to higher PSD. PSD of the LDV signal was less dependent on the downstream measurement location than pressure. The strength of the association between PSD and flow level, model material and measuring location was highest in the 0–50 Hz range, however useful information was found up to 200 Hz. This proof-of-concept suggests that LDV has the potential to detect stenosis-induced disturbed flow. Further computational and clinical validation studies are ongoing to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the technique for clinical screening.

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MLA
Mancini, Viviana et al. “Detecting Carotid Stenosis from Skin Vibrations Using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an In-vitro Proof-of-concept.” Ed. Rudolf Kirchmair. PLOS ONE 14.6 (2019): n. pag. Print.
APA
Mancini, V., Tommasin, D., Li, Y., Reeves, J., Baets, R., Greenwald, S., & Segers, P. (2019). Detecting carotid stenosis from skin vibrations using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an in-vitro proof-of-concept. (R. Kirchmair, Ed.)PLOS ONE, 14(6).
Chicago author-date
Mancini, Viviana, Daniela Tommasin, Yanlu Li, Jonathan Reeves, Roel Baets, Steve Greenwald, and Patrick Segers. 2019. “Detecting Carotid Stenosis from Skin Vibrations Using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an In-vitro Proof-of-concept.” Ed. Rudolf Kirchmair. Plos One 14 (6).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Mancini, Viviana, Daniela Tommasin, Yanlu Li, Jonathan Reeves, Roel Baets, Steve Greenwald, and Patrick Segers. 2019. “Detecting Carotid Stenosis from Skin Vibrations Using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an In-vitro Proof-of-concept.” Ed. Rudolf Kirchmair. Plos One 14 (6).
Vancouver
1.
Mancini V, Tommasin D, Li Y, Reeves J, Baets R, Greenwald S, et al. Detecting carotid stenosis from skin vibrations using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an in-vitro proof-of-concept. Kirchmair R, editor. PLOS ONE. 2019;14(6).
IEEE
[1]
V. Mancini et al., “Detecting carotid stenosis from skin vibrations using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an in-vitro proof-of-concept,” PLOS ONE, vol. 14, no. 6, 2019.
@article{8623924,
  abstract     = {Early detection of asymptomatic carotid stenosis may help identifying individuals at risk of
stroke. We explore a new method based on laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) which could
allow the non-contact detection of stenosis from neck skin vibrations due to stenosisinduced
flow disturbances. Experimental fluid dynamical tests were performed with water on
a severely stenosed patient-specific carotid bifurcation model. Measurements were taken
under various physiological flow regimes both in a compliant and stiff-walled version of the
model, at 1 to 4 diameters downstream from the stenosis. An inter-arterial pressure catheter
was positioned as reference. Increasing flow led to corresponding increase in power spectral
density (PSD) of pressure and LDV recordings in the 0–500 Hz range. The stiff model
lead to higher PSD. PSD of the LDV signal was less dependent on the downstream measurement
location than pressure. The strength of the association between PSD and flow
level, model material and measuring location was highest in the 0–50 Hz range, however
useful information was found up to 200 Hz. This proof-of-concept suggests that LDV has the
potential to detect stenosis-induced disturbed flow. Further computational and clinical validation
studies are ongoing to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the technique for clinical
screening.},
  articleno    = {e0218317},
  author       = {Mancini, Viviana and Tommasin, Daniela and Li, Yanlu and Reeves, Jonathan and Baets, Roel and Greenwald, Steve and Segers, Patrick},
  editor       = {Kirchmair, Rudolf},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {17},
  title        = {Detecting carotid stenosis from skin vibrations using Laser Doppler Vibrometry : an in-vitro proof-of-concept},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218317},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2019},
}

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