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Very late xerostomia, dysphagia, and neck fibrosis after head and neck radiotherapy

Margot Baudelet (UGent) , Leen Van den Steen (UGent) , Peter Tomassen (UGent) , Katrien Bonte (UGent) , Philippe Deron (UGent) , Wouter Huvenne (UGent) , Sylvie Rottey (UGent) , Wilfried De Neve (UGent) , Nora Sundahl (UGent) , Gwen Van Nuffelen (UGent) , et al.
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Abstract
Background Acute and late toxicity after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC) impacts on patient quality of life; yet, very late toxicity data remain scarce. This study assessed dysphagia, xerostomia, and neck fibrosis 3-8 years after IMRT. Methods A retrospective analysis using generalized estimated equations was performed on 60 patients with HNC treated with fractionated IMRT between 2000 and 2015 who had a follow-up >= 8 years. Toxicity was scored using LENT-SOMA scales. Results A trend towards a nonlinear global time effect (P = .05) was noted for dysphagia with a decrease during the 5 years post-treatment and an increase thereafter. A significant decrease in xerostomia (P = .001) and an increase in neck fibrosis (P = .04) was observed until 8 years. Conclusions Dysphagia, xerostomia, and neck fibrosis do not appear stable over time and remain highly prevalent in the very late follow-up. Our findings support the need for prospective trials investigating very late toxicity in patients with HNC.
Keywords
Otorhinolaryngology, dysphagia, head and neck cancer, IMRT, neck fibrosis, xerostomia, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY, LOCALLY ADVANCED HEAD, SEVERE LATE TOXICITY, LONG-TERM DYSPHAGIA, CANCER-PATIENTS, TREATMENT OUTCOMES, TREATMENT MODALITY, RADIATION-THERAPY, TUMOR-CONTROL

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MLA
Baudelet, Margot, et al. “Very Late Xerostomia, Dysphagia, and Neck Fibrosis after Head and Neck Radiotherapy.” EAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, vol. 41, no. 10, 2019, pp. 3594–603.
APA
Baudelet, M., Van den Steen, L., Tomassen, P., Bonte, K., Deron, P., Huvenne, W., … Duprez, F. (2019). Very late xerostomia, dysphagia, and neck fibrosis after head and neck radiotherapy. EAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, 41(10), 3594–3603.
Chicago author-date
Baudelet, Margot, Leen Van den Steen, Peter Tomassen, Katrien Bonte, Philippe Deron, Wouter Huvenne, Sylvie Rottey, et al. 2019. “Very Late Xerostomia, Dysphagia, and Neck Fibrosis after Head and Neck Radiotherapy.” EAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK 41 (10): 3594–3603.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Baudelet, Margot, Leen Van den Steen, Peter Tomassen, Katrien Bonte, Philippe Deron, Wouter Huvenne, Sylvie Rottey, Wilfried De Neve, Nora Sundahl, Gwen Van Nuffelen, and Fréderic Duprez. 2019. “Very Late Xerostomia, Dysphagia, and Neck Fibrosis after Head and Neck Radiotherapy.” EAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK 41 (10): 3594–3603.
Vancouver
1.
Baudelet M, Van den Steen L, Tomassen P, Bonte K, Deron P, Huvenne W, et al. Very late xerostomia, dysphagia, and neck fibrosis after head and neck radiotherapy. EAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK. 2019;41(10):3594–603.
IEEE
[1]
M. Baudelet et al., “Very late xerostomia, dysphagia, and neck fibrosis after head and neck radiotherapy,” EAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 3594–3603, 2019.
@article{8623797,
  abstract     = {Background Acute and late toxicity after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC) impacts on patient quality of life; yet, very late toxicity data remain scarce. This study assessed dysphagia, xerostomia, and neck fibrosis 3-8 years after IMRT. Methods A retrospective analysis using generalized estimated equations was performed on 60 patients with HNC treated with fractionated IMRT between 2000 and 2015 who had a follow-up >= 8 years. Toxicity was scored using LENT-SOMA scales. Results A trend towards a nonlinear global time effect (P = .05) was noted for dysphagia with a decrease during the 5 years post-treatment and an increase thereafter. A significant decrease in xerostomia (P = .001) and an increase in neck fibrosis (P = .04) was observed until 8 years. Conclusions Dysphagia, xerostomia, and neck fibrosis do not appear stable over time and remain highly prevalent in the very late follow-up. Our findings support the need for prospective trials investigating very late toxicity in patients with HNC.},
  author       = {Baudelet, Margot and Van den Steen, Leen and Tomassen, Peter and Bonte, Katrien and Deron, Philippe and Huvenne, Wouter and Rottey, Sylvie and De Neve, Wilfried and Sundahl, Nora and Van Nuffelen, Gwen and Duprez, Fréderic},
  issn         = {1043-3074},
  journal      = {EAD AND NECK-JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES AND SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK},
  keywords     = {Otorhinolaryngology,dysphagia,head and neck cancer,IMRT,neck fibrosis,xerostomia,QUALITY-OF-LIFE,INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY,LOCALLY ADVANCED HEAD,SEVERE LATE TOXICITY,LONG-TERM DYSPHAGIA,CANCER-PATIENTS,TREATMENT OUTCOMES,TREATMENT MODALITY,RADIATION-THERAPY,TUMOR-CONTROL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {3594--3603},
  title        = {Very late xerostomia, dysphagia, and neck fibrosis after head and neck radiotherapy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hed.25880},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2019},
}

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