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Impact of red versus white meat consumption in a prudent or Western dietary pattern on the oxidative status in a pig model

Sophie Goethals (UGent) , Els Vossen (UGent) , Joris Michiels (UGent) , Lynn Vanhaecke (UGent) , John Van Camp (UGent) , Thomas Van Hecke (UGent) and Stefaan De Smet (UGent)
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Abstract
Human diets contain a complex mixture of antioxidants and pro-oxidants that contribute to the body's oxidative status. In this study, 32 pigs were fed chicken versus red and processed meat in the context of a prudent or Western dietary pattern for 4 weeks, to investigate their oxidative status. Lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and hexanal) were higher in the chicken versus red and processed meat diets (1.7- to 8.3-fold) and subsequent in vitro (1.3- to 1.9-fold) and in vivo (1.4 to 3-fold) digests (P < 0.001), which was presumably related to the higher polyunsaturated fatty acid content in chicken meat and/or the added antioxidants in processed meat. However, diet had only a marginal or no effect on the systemic oxidative status, as determined by plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity, malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and organs, except for alpha-tocopherol, which was higher after the consumption of the chicken-Western diet. In conclusion, in contrast to the hypothesis, the consumption of chicken in comparison to that of the red and processed meat resulted in higher concentrations of lipid oxidation products in the pig intestinal contents; however, this was not reflected in the body's oxidative status.
Keywords
red meat, oxidative stress, pigs, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY, VITAMIN-E, ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY, LIPID-PEROXIDATION, PROTEIN OXIDATION, STOMACH MEDIUM, FAT-CONTENT, IN-VIVO, BEEF, MALONDIALDEHYDE

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Citation

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MLA
Goethals, Sophie et al. “Impact of Red Versus White Meat Consumption in a Prudent or Western Dietary Pattern on the Oxidative Status in a Pig Model.” JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY 67.19 (2019): 5661–5671. Print.
APA
Goethals, Sophie, Vossen, E., Michiels, J., Vanhaecke, L., Van Camp, J., Van Hecke, T., & De Smet, S. (2019). Impact of red versus white meat consumption in a prudent or Western dietary pattern on the oxidative status in a pig model. JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, 67(19), 5661–5671.
Chicago author-date
Goethals, Sophie, Els Vossen, Joris Michiels, Lynn Vanhaecke, John Van Camp, Thomas Van Hecke, and Stefaan De Smet. 2019. “Impact of Red Versus White Meat Consumption in a Prudent or Western Dietary Pattern on the Oxidative Status in a Pig Model.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 67 (19): 5661–5671.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Goethals, Sophie, Els Vossen, Joris Michiels, Lynn Vanhaecke, John Van Camp, Thomas Van Hecke, and Stefaan De Smet. 2019. “Impact of Red Versus White Meat Consumption in a Prudent or Western Dietary Pattern on the Oxidative Status in a Pig Model.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 67 (19): 5661–5671.
Vancouver
1.
Goethals S, Vossen E, Michiels J, Vanhaecke L, Van Camp J, Van Hecke T, et al. Impact of red versus white meat consumption in a prudent or Western dietary pattern on the oxidative status in a pig model. JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY. 2019;67(19):5661–71.
IEEE
[1]
S. Goethals et al., “Impact of red versus white meat consumption in a prudent or Western dietary pattern on the oxidative status in a pig model,” JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, vol. 67, no. 19, pp. 5661–5671, 2019.
@article{8623595,
  abstract     = {Human diets contain a complex mixture of antioxidants and pro-oxidants that contribute to the body's oxidative status. In this study, 32 pigs were fed chicken versus red and processed meat in the context of a prudent or Western dietary pattern for 4 weeks, to investigate their oxidative status. Lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and hexanal) were higher in the chicken versus red and processed meat diets (1.7- to 8.3-fold) and subsequent in vitro (1.3- to 1.9-fold) and in vivo (1.4 to 3-fold) digests (P < 0.001), which was presumably related to the higher polyunsaturated fatty acid content in chicken meat and/or the added antioxidants in processed meat. However, diet had only a marginal or no effect on the systemic oxidative status, as determined by plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity, malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and organs, except for alpha-tocopherol, which was higher after the consumption of the chicken-Western diet. In conclusion, in contrast to the hypothesis, the consumption of chicken in comparison to that of the red and processed meat resulted in higher concentrations of lipid oxidation products in the pig intestinal contents; however, this was not reflected in the body's oxidative status.},
  author       = {Goethals, Sophie and Vossen, Els and Michiels, Joris and Vanhaecke, Lynn and Van Camp, John and Van Hecke, Thomas and De Smet, Stefaan},
  issn         = {0021-8561},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY},
  keywords     = {red meat,oxidative stress,pigs,malondialdehyde,4-hydroxy-2-nonenal,PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY,VITAMIN-E,ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY,LIPID-PEROXIDATION,PROTEIN OXIDATION,STOMACH MEDIUM,FAT-CONTENT,IN-VIVO,BEEF,MALONDIALDEHYDE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {19},
  pages        = {5661--5671},
  title        = {Impact of red versus white meat consumption in a prudent or Western dietary pattern on the oxidative status in a pig model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.9b00559},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2019},
}

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