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The devil is in the detail : discrepancy between soil organic carbon stocks estimated from regional and local data sources in Flanders, Belgium

(2019) SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT. 35(3). p.421-432
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Abstract
Storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an essential function of ecosystems underpinning the delivery of multiple services to society. Regional SOC stock estimates often rely on data collected during land-use-specific inventory schemes with varying sampling depth and density. Using such data requires techniques that can deal with the associated heterogeneity. As the resulting SOC assessments are not calibrated for the local scale, they could suffer from oversimplification of landscape processes and heterogeneity. This might especially be the case for sandy regions where typical historical land use practices and soil development processes determine SOC storage. The aims of this study were (a) to combine four land-use-specific SOC stock assessments to estimate the total stock in Flanders, Belgium, and (b) to evaluate the applicability of this regional-scale estimate at the local scale. We estimated the SOC stock in the upper 100 cm of the unsealed area in Flanders (887,745 ha) to be 111.67 Mt OC, or 12.6 +/- 5.65 kg OC m(-2) on average. In general, soils under (semi-) natural land-use types, for example forests, store on average more organic carbon than under agriculture. However, overall agricultural soils store the largest amounts of SOC due to their vast spatial extent. Zooming in on a sandy location study (13.55 km(2)) revealed the poor performance of the regional estimates, especially where Histosols occurred. Our findings show that a greater spatial sampling density is required when SOC stock estimates are needed to inform carbon-aware land management rather than to provide for regional reporting.
Keywords
carbon hotspot, ecosystem service, local assessment, regional assessment, soil organic carbon, spatial scale, AGRICULTURAL SOILS, LANDSCAPE UNITS, UNCERTAINTIES, CLIMATE, MATTER, SOC

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MLA
Ottoy, Sam, et al. “The Devil Is in the Detail : Discrepancy between Soil Organic Carbon Stocks Estimated from Regional and Local Data Sources in Flanders, Belgium.” SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT, vol. 35, no. 3, 2019, pp. 421–32.
APA
Ottoy, S., Vanierschot, L., Dondeyne, S., Vancampenhout, K., Hermy, M., & Van Orshoven, J. (2019). The devil is in the detail : discrepancy between soil organic carbon stocks estimated from regional and local data sources in Flanders, Belgium. SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT, 35(3), 421–432.
Chicago author-date
Ottoy, Sam, Laura Vanierschot, Stefaan Dondeyne, Karen Vancampenhout, Martin Hermy, and Jos Van Orshoven. 2019. “The Devil Is in the Detail : Discrepancy between Soil Organic Carbon Stocks Estimated from Regional and Local Data Sources in Flanders, Belgium.” SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT 35 (3): 421–32.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Ottoy, Sam, Laura Vanierschot, Stefaan Dondeyne, Karen Vancampenhout, Martin Hermy, and Jos Van Orshoven. 2019. “The Devil Is in the Detail : Discrepancy between Soil Organic Carbon Stocks Estimated from Regional and Local Data Sources in Flanders, Belgium.” SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT 35 (3): 421–432.
Vancouver
1.
Ottoy S, Vanierschot L, Dondeyne S, Vancampenhout K, Hermy M, Van Orshoven J. The devil is in the detail : discrepancy between soil organic carbon stocks estimated from regional and local data sources in Flanders, Belgium. SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT. 2019;35(3):421–32.
IEEE
[1]
S. Ottoy, L. Vanierschot, S. Dondeyne, K. Vancampenhout, M. Hermy, and J. Van Orshoven, “The devil is in the detail : discrepancy between soil organic carbon stocks estimated from regional and local data sources in Flanders, Belgium,” SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 421–432, 2019.
@article{8621254,
  abstract     = {{Storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an essential function of ecosystems underpinning the delivery of multiple services to society. Regional SOC stock estimates often rely on data collected during land-use-specific inventory schemes with varying sampling depth and density. Using such data requires techniques that can deal with the associated heterogeneity. As the resulting SOC assessments are not calibrated for the local scale, they could suffer from oversimplification of landscape processes and heterogeneity. This might especially be the case for sandy regions where typical historical land use practices and soil development processes determine SOC storage. The aims of this study were (a) to combine four land-use-specific SOC stock assessments to estimate the total stock in Flanders, Belgium, and (b) to evaluate the applicability of this regional-scale estimate at the local scale. We estimated the SOC stock in the upper 100 cm of the unsealed area in Flanders (887,745 ha) to be 111.67 Mt OC, or 12.6 +/- 5.65 kg OC m(-2) on average. In general, soils under (semi-) natural land-use types, for example forests, store on average more organic carbon than under agriculture. However, overall agricultural soils store the largest amounts of SOC due to their vast spatial extent. Zooming in on a sandy location study (13.55 km(2)) revealed the poor performance of the regional estimates, especially where Histosols occurred. Our findings show that a greater spatial sampling density is required when SOC stock estimates are needed to inform carbon-aware land management rather than to provide for regional reporting.}},
  author       = {{Ottoy, Sam and Vanierschot, Laura and Dondeyne, Stefaan and Vancampenhout, Karen and Hermy, Martin and Van Orshoven, Jos}},
  issn         = {{0266-0032}},
  journal      = {{SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT}},
  keywords     = {{carbon hotspot,ecosystem service,local assessment,regional assessment,soil organic carbon,spatial scale,AGRICULTURAL SOILS,LANDSCAPE UNITS,UNCERTAINTIES,CLIMATE,MATTER,SOC}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{3}},
  pages        = {{421--432}},
  title        = {{The devil is in the detail : discrepancy between soil organic carbon stocks estimated from regional and local data sources in Flanders, Belgium}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sum.12504}},
  volume       = {{35}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}

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