Advanced search
1 file | 285.63 KB

Drainage and retention of water in small drainage cavities: Experimental assessment

Author
Organization
Abstract
Water that enters the drainage cavity of a rain screen wall assembly through deficiencies in the cladding will either be drained or retained by absorption or adhesion on the drainage surfaces. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the different factors that affect the quantity of water drained or retained in a drainage cavity. Drainage tests have been conducted for water flowing between two vertical polycarbonate plates with different gap widths to determine the effect on the drainage rate. Tests showed that even small cavities with a width of 1 mm can already drain more water than the amount that would enter the cavity during a rain event. Experiments were performed to determine the contact angle of water on a range of different sheathing materials such as asphalt saturated building paper, spun-bonded polyethylene wrap and cross-woven polyolefin wrap by the use of an optical goniometer. Drainage tests have been conducted for different combinations of these materials to quantify the effect of surface energy on the drainage rate. A larger contact angle results in a smaller quantity of water retained during the drainage test. These tests result in a retained portion of water and a drainage rate for different combinations of materials. The retained portion of water may be considered as a moisture load applied to the outer-most layer of the wall assembly’s back-up wall in hygrothermal simulations.
Keywords
Water drainage, small drainage cavities, contact angle, retention

Downloads

  • IBPC2018-drainage small cavities-final paper.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 285.63 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van Linden, Stéphanie, Nathan Van Den Bossche, and Michael Lacasse. 2018. “Drainage and Retention of Water in Small Drainage Cavities: Experimental Assessment.” In IBPC2018 Proceedings Syracuse, NY, USA Healty, Intelligent and Resilient Building and Urban Environments, 91–96. Syracuse, NY, USA.
APA
Van Linden, S., Van Den Bossche, N., & Lacasse, M. (2018). Drainage and retention of water in small drainage cavities: Experimental assessment. IBPC2018 Proceedings Syracuse, NY, USA Healty, Intelligent and Resilient Building and Urban Environments (pp. 91–96). Presented at the IBPC 2018, Syracuse, NY, USA.
Vancouver
1.
Van Linden S, Van Den Bossche N, Lacasse M. Drainage and retention of water in small drainage cavities: Experimental assessment. IBPC2018 Proceedings Syracuse, NY, USA Healty, Intelligent and Resilient Building and Urban Environments. Syracuse, NY, USA; 2018. p. 91–6.
MLA
Van Linden, Stéphanie, Nathan Van Den Bossche, and Michael Lacasse. “Drainage and Retention of Water in Small Drainage Cavities: Experimental Assessment.” IBPC2018 Proceedings Syracuse, NY, USA Healty, Intelligent and Resilient Building and Urban Environments. Syracuse, NY, USA, 2018. 91–96. Print.
@inproceedings{8621043,
  abstract     = {Water that enters the drainage cavity of a rain screen wall assembly through deficiencies in the cladding will either be drained or retained by absorption or adhesion on the drainage surfaces. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the different factors that affect the quantity of water drained or retained in a drainage cavity. Drainage tests have been conducted for water flowing between two vertical polycarbonate plates with different gap widths to determine the effect on the drainage rate. Tests showed that even small cavities with a width of 1 mm can already drain more water than the amount that would enter the cavity during a rain event. Experiments were performed to determine the contact angle of water on a range of different sheathing materials such as asphalt saturated building paper, spun-bonded polyethylene wrap and cross-woven polyolefin wrap by the use of an optical goniometer. Drainage tests have been conducted for different combinations of these materials to quantify the effect of surface energy on the drainage rate. A larger contact angle results in a smaller quantity of water retained during the drainage test. These tests result in a retained portion of water and a drainage rate for different combinations of materials. The retained portion of water may be considered as a moisture load applied to the outer-most layer of the wall assembly’s back-up wall in hygrothermal simulations.},
  author       = {Van Linden, Stéphanie and Van Den Bossche, Nathan and Lacasse, Michael},
  booktitle    = {IBPC2018 Proceedings Syracuse, NY, USA Healty, Intelligent and Resilient Building and Urban Environments},
  keywords     = {Water drainage,small drainage cavities,contact angle,retention},
  location     = {Syracuse, NY, USA},
  pages        = {91--96},
  title        = {Drainage and retention of water in small drainage cavities: Experimental assessment},
  year         = {2018},
}