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Sleeping beauties in materials science : unlocking the value of xylarium specimens in the search for timbers of the future

(2019) HOLZFORSCHUNG. 73(10). p.889-897
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Abstract
Wood ranks among the most valued resources in construction, for joinery and furniture. Rather than increasing the pressure on a limited number of species, we need to move towards a fit for purpose approach where the basis for selection of a material is a solid knowledge of its relevant properties. Therefore, knowledge about wood technological characteristics of a vast range of wood species is needed. Here, we exploit the potential of xylarium samples by mapping wood density and dimensional stability, using digital image correlation (DIC) on non-standardised samples, of 53 different tropical wood species from the Congo Basin. Furthermore, we attempt to link the results with quantitative anatomical features of the different species tested. DIC proved successful compared to standard calliper measurements on reference samples (R-2-radial =0.94, R-2-tangential =0.96). Vessel properties play a larger role towards explaining dimensional stability compared to wood density. Fibre wall thickness is positively related to wood density and volumetric swelling. We are able to differentiate between species and sample groups with similar behaviour, partially explained by their anatomical structure. Selecting species based on the required properties for the targeted end use as such can unlock the potential of currently unknown species.
Keywords
dimensional stability, fit for purpose, joinery, tropical timber, wood anatomy, wood density, xylarium, WOOD DENSITY, ANATOMY, SHRINKAGE, TRAITS, IMAGE, BIOMECHANICS, ROOTS

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MLA
Deklerck, Victor, et al. “Sleeping Beauties in Materials Science : Unlocking the Value of Xylarium Specimens in the Search for Timbers of the Future.” HOLZFORSCHUNG, vol. 73, no. 10, 2019, pp. 889–97.
APA
Deklerck, V., De Mil, T., Onotamba Kondjo, P., Beeckman, H., Van Acker, J., & Van den Bulcke, J. (2019). Sleeping beauties in materials science : unlocking the value of xylarium specimens in the search for timbers of the future. HOLZFORSCHUNG, 73(10), 889–897.
Chicago author-date
Deklerck, Victor, Tom De Mil, Patrick Onotamba Kondjo, Hans Beeckman, Joris Van Acker, and Jan Van den Bulcke. 2019. “Sleeping Beauties in Materials Science : Unlocking the Value of Xylarium Specimens in the Search for Timbers of the Future.” HOLZFORSCHUNG 73 (10): 889–97.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Deklerck, Victor, Tom De Mil, Patrick Onotamba Kondjo, Hans Beeckman, Joris Van Acker, and Jan Van den Bulcke. 2019. “Sleeping Beauties in Materials Science : Unlocking the Value of Xylarium Specimens in the Search for Timbers of the Future.” HOLZFORSCHUNG 73 (10): 889–897.
Vancouver
1.
Deklerck V, De Mil T, Onotamba Kondjo P, Beeckman H, Van Acker J, Van den Bulcke J. Sleeping beauties in materials science : unlocking the value of xylarium specimens in the search for timbers of the future. HOLZFORSCHUNG. 2019;73(10):889–97.
IEEE
[1]
V. Deklerck, T. De Mil, P. Onotamba Kondjo, H. Beeckman, J. Van Acker, and J. Van den Bulcke, “Sleeping beauties in materials science : unlocking the value of xylarium specimens in the search for timbers of the future,” HOLZFORSCHUNG, vol. 73, no. 10, pp. 889–897, 2019.
@article{8620239,
  abstract     = {Wood ranks among the most valued resources in construction, for joinery and furniture. Rather than increasing the pressure on a limited number of species, we need to move towards a fit for purpose approach where the basis for selection of a material is a solid knowledge of its relevant properties. Therefore, knowledge about wood technological characteristics of a vast range of wood species is needed. Here, we exploit the potential of xylarium samples by mapping wood density and dimensional stability, using digital image correlation (DIC) on non-standardised samples, of 53 different tropical wood species from the Congo Basin. Furthermore, we attempt to link the results with quantitative anatomical features of the different species tested. DIC proved successful compared to standard calliper measurements on reference samples (R-2-radial =0.94, R-2-tangential =0.96). Vessel properties play a larger role towards explaining dimensional stability compared to wood density. Fibre wall thickness is positively related to wood density and volumetric swelling. We are able to differentiate between species and sample groups with similar behaviour, partially explained by their anatomical structure. Selecting species based on the required properties for the targeted end use as such can unlock the potential of currently unknown species.},
  author       = {Deklerck, Victor and De Mil, Tom and Onotamba Kondjo, Patrick and Beeckman, Hans and Van Acker, Joris and Van den Bulcke, Jan},
  issn         = {0018-3830},
  journal      = {HOLZFORSCHUNG},
  keywords     = {dimensional stability,fit for purpose,joinery,tropical timber,wood anatomy,wood density,xylarium,WOOD DENSITY,ANATOMY,SHRINKAGE,TRAITS,IMAGE,BIOMECHANICS,ROOTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {889--897},
  title        = {Sleeping beauties in materials science : unlocking the value of xylarium specimens in the search for timbers of the future},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hf-2018-0269},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2019},
}

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