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A factorial randomised controlled trial to identify efficacious self-regulation techniques in an e- and m-health intervention to target an active lifestyle : study protocol

Helene Schroé (UGent) , Celien Van der Mispel (UGent) , Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij (UGent) , Maïté Verloigne (UGent) , Louise Poppe (UGent) and Geert Crombez (UGent)
(2019) TRIALS. 20.
Author
Organization
Abstract
BackgroundSufficient physical activity and a limited amount of sedentary behaviour can prevent a range of chronic diseases. However, most adults do not meet the recommendations for physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Effective and engaging interventions are needed to change people's behaviour. E- and m-health interventions are promising, but unfortunately they result in small effects and suffer from high attrition rates. Improvements to intervention content and design are required. Qualitative research has revealed the need for clear and concise interventions. Furthermore, many interventions use a range of behaviour-change techniques, and it is yet unknown whether these techniques are equally important to obtain behaviour change. It may well be that a limited set of these techniques is sufficient. In this study, the aim is to experimentally investigate the efficacy of three behaviour-change techniques (i.e. action planning, coping planning and self-monitoring) on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and related determinants among adults.MethodsIn a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial trial participants will be randomly allocated to eight groups (including one control group). Each group will receive a different version of the self-regulation-based e- and m-health intervention MyPlan 2.0', in which three behaviour-change techniques (i.e. action planning, coping planning, self-monitoring) will be combined in order to achieve self-formulated goals about physical activity or sedentary behaviour. Goal attainment, and levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour will be measured via self-report questionnaires.DiscussionThis study should provide insight into the role of various behaviour-change techniques in changing health behaviour and its determinants. Its experimental and longitudinal design, with repeated measures of several determinants of behaviour change, allows an in-depth analysis of the processes underlying behaviour change, enabling the authors to provide guidance for the development of future e- and m-health interventions.Trial registrationThis study is registered as MyPlan 2.0 as a clinical trial (ID number: NCT03274271). Release date: 20 October 2017.
Keywords
EHealth, mHealth, Self-regulation, Behaviour-change techniques, Study protoco l, Physical activity, Sedentary behaviour, BEHAVIOR-CHANGE TECHNIQUES, PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY LEVELS, CHRONIC ILLNESS, ADULTS, VALIDITY, EXERCISE, EHEALTH, ENGAGEMENT, BENEFITS, TAXONOMY

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Chicago
Schroé, Helene, Celien Van der Mispel, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Maïté Verloigne, Louise Poppe, and Geert Crombez. 2019. “A Factorial Randomised Controlled Trial to Identify Efficacious Self-regulation Techniques in an E- and M-health Intervention to Target an Active Lifestyle : Study Protocol.” Trials 20.
APA
Schroé, H., Van der Mispel, C., De Bourdeaudhuij, I., Verloigne, M., Poppe, L., & Crombez, G. (2019). A factorial randomised controlled trial to identify efficacious self-regulation techniques in an e- and m-health intervention to target an active lifestyle : study protocol. TRIALS, 20.
Vancouver
1.
Schroé H, Van der Mispel C, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Verloigne M, Poppe L, Crombez G. A factorial randomised controlled trial to identify efficacious self-regulation techniques in an e- and m-health intervention to target an active lifestyle : study protocol. TRIALS. 2019;20.
MLA
Schroé, Helene et al. “A Factorial Randomised Controlled Trial to Identify Efficacious Self-regulation Techniques in an E- and M-health Intervention to Target an Active Lifestyle : Study Protocol.” TRIALS 20 (2019): n. pag. Print.
@article{8620092,
  abstract     = {BackgroundSufficient physical activity and a limited amount of sedentary behaviour can prevent a range of chronic diseases. However, most adults do not meet the recommendations for physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Effective and engaging interventions are needed to change people's behaviour. E- and m-health interventions are promising, but unfortunately they result in small effects and suffer from high attrition rates. Improvements to intervention content and design are required. Qualitative research has revealed the need for clear and concise interventions. Furthermore, many interventions use a range of behaviour-change techniques, and it is yet unknown whether these techniques are equally important to obtain behaviour change. It may well be that a limited set of these techniques is sufficient. In this study, the aim is to experimentally investigate the efficacy of three behaviour-change techniques (i.e. action planning, coping planning and self-monitoring) on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and related determinants among adults.MethodsIn a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial trial participants will be randomly allocated to eight groups (including one control group). Each group will receive a different version of the self-regulation-based e- and m-health intervention MyPlan 2.0', in which three behaviour-change techniques (i.e. action planning, coping planning, self-monitoring) will be combined in order to achieve self-formulated goals about physical activity or sedentary behaviour. Goal attainment, and levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour will be measured via self-report questionnaires.DiscussionThis study should provide insight into the role of various behaviour-change techniques in changing health behaviour and its determinants. Its experimental and longitudinal design, with repeated measures of several determinants of behaviour change, allows an in-depth analysis of the processes underlying behaviour change, enabling the authors to provide guidance for the development of future e- and m-health interventions.Trial registrationThis study is registered as MyPlan 2.0 as a clinical trial (ID number: NCT03274271). Release date: 20 October 2017.},
  articleno    = {340},
  author       = {Schroé, Helene and Van der Mispel, Celien and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and Verloigne, Maïté and Poppe, Louise and Crombez, Geert},
  issn         = {1745-6215},
  journal      = {TRIALS},
  keywords     = {EHealth,mHealth,Self-regulation,Behaviour-change techniques,Study protoco l,Physical activity,Sedentary behaviour,BEHAVIOR-CHANGE TECHNIQUES,PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY LEVELS,CHRONIC ILLNESS,ADULTS,VALIDITY,EXERCISE,EHEALTH,ENGAGEMENT,BENEFITS,TAXONOMY},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {14},
  title        = {A factorial randomised controlled trial to identify efficacious self-regulation techniques in an e- and m-health intervention to target an active lifestyle : study protocol},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-019-3456-7},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2019},
}

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