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From neural crest cells to melanocytes : cellular plasticity during development and beyond

Niels Vandamme (UGent) and Geert Berx (UGent)
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Abstract
Here, we review melanocyte development and how the embryonic melanoblast, although specified to become a melanocyte, is prone to cellular plasticity and is not fully committed to the melanocyte lineage. Even fully differentiated and pigment-producing melanocytes do not always have a stable phenotype. The gradual lineage restriction of neural crest cells toward the melanocyte lineage is determined by both cell-intrinsic and extracellular signals in which differentiation and pathfinding ability reciprocally influence each other. These signals are leveraged by subtle differences in timing and axial positioning. The most extensively studied migration route is the dorsolateral path between the dermomyotome and the prospective epidermis, restricted to melanoblasts. In addition, the embryonic origin of the skin dermis through which neural crest derivatives migrate may also affect the segregation between melanogenic and neurogenic cells in embryos. It is widely accepted that, irrespective of the model organism studied, the immediate precursor of both melanoblast and neurogenic populations is a glial-melanogenic bipotent progenitor. Upon exposure to different conditions, melanoblasts may differentiate into other neural crest-derived lineages such as neuronal cells and vice versa. Key factors that regulate melanoblast migration and patterning will regulate melanocyte homeostasis during different stages of hair cycling in postnatal hair follicles.
Keywords
STEM-CELLS, TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR, LINEAGE, INDUCTION, ORIGIN, SKIN, MELANOGENESIS, MAINTENANCE, ACTIVATION, MECHANISMS, Neural crest, Cellular plasticity, Migration, Melanocytes, EMT, ZEB, proteins

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Chicago
Vandamme, Niels, and Geert Berx. 2019. “From Neural Crest Cells to Melanocytes : Cellular Plasticity During Development and Beyond.” Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences 76 (10): 1919–1934.
APA
Vandamme, N., & Berx, G. (2019). From neural crest cells to melanocytes : cellular plasticity during development and beyond. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR LIFE SCIENCES, 76(10), 1919–1934.
Vancouver
1.
Vandamme N, Berx G. From neural crest cells to melanocytes : cellular plasticity during development and beyond. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR LIFE SCIENCES. 2019;76(10):1919–34.
MLA
Vandamme, Niels, and Geert Berx. “From Neural Crest Cells to Melanocytes : Cellular Plasticity During Development and Beyond.” CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR LIFE SCIENCES 76.10 (2019): 1919–1934. Print.
@article{8617540,
  abstract     = {Here, we review melanocyte development and how the embryonic melanoblast, although specified to become a melanocyte, is prone to cellular plasticity and is not fully committed to the melanocyte lineage. Even fully differentiated and pigment-producing melanocytes do not always have a stable phenotype. The gradual lineage restriction of neural crest cells toward the melanocyte lineage is determined by both cell-intrinsic and extracellular signals in which differentiation and pathfinding ability reciprocally influence each other. These signals are leveraged by subtle differences in timing and axial positioning. The most extensively studied migration route is the dorsolateral path between the dermomyotome and the prospective epidermis, restricted to melanoblasts. In addition, the embryonic origin of the skin dermis through which neural crest derivatives migrate may also affect the segregation between melanogenic and neurogenic cells in embryos. It is widely accepted that, irrespective of the model organism studied, the immediate precursor of both melanoblast and neurogenic populations is a glial-melanogenic bipotent progenitor. Upon exposure to different conditions, melanoblasts may differentiate into other neural crest-derived lineages such as neuronal cells and vice versa. Key factors that regulate melanoblast migration and patterning will regulate melanocyte homeostasis during different stages of hair cycling in postnatal hair follicles.},
  author       = {Vandamme, Niels and Berx, Geert},
  issn         = {1420-682X},
  journal      = {CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR LIFE SCIENCES},
  keywords     = {STEM-CELLS,TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR,LINEAGE,INDUCTION,ORIGIN,SKIN,MELANOGENESIS,MAINTENANCE,ACTIVATION,MECHANISMS,Neural crest,Cellular plasticity,Migration,Melanocytes,EMT,ZEB,proteins},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1919--1934},
  title        = {From neural crest cells to melanocytes : cellular plasticity during development and beyond},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00018-019-03049-w},
  volume       = {76},
  year         = {2019},
}

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