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Work ability in nursing: the role of relative heart rate reserve and work-related stress

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Abstract
Introduction and/or Aim(s): Western countries are facing a demographic evolution which induces an increase of the retirement age. As a result, the workforce is gradually ageing and a higher number of employees suffer from health problems. Questions are raised regarding the feasibility of professions with high physical and mental workload, such as nursing. Work ability is a concept to achieve insight into nursing. First, the association between the subjective perception of current work ability and the relative heart rate reserve (%HRR) was investigated. Second, the role of the psychosocial work environment according to the Job DemandControl-Support model, as a moderator in that association was analysed. Methods: 83 nurses at University Hospital Ghent, including 15 men and 68 women, underwent the test procedure, containing questionnaires about the subjective perception of current work ability, using the Work Ability Score (WAS), and three different work stressors (job demands, job control and social support), using the Dutch version of the Job Content Questionnaire. Finally, objective registrations of the ambulatory heart rate were executed to calculate the mean %HRR at work. Results: No significant association between %HRR and WAS was observed. Multiple linear regressions demonstrated that job control and social support were significantly and positively associated to WAS and that job demands and social support moderated the association between %HRR and WAS. In the stratified analysis, the Spearman correlation showed a tendency towards a positive association between %HRR and WAS among nurses with low social support. Conclusions and/or implications: The results imply the importance of involving the psychosocial work environment in further research on the work ability of nurses, which is highlighted by the significant positive relationship of the WAS with job control and social support. Future studies are needed to verify the current statements, using a more extensive group.

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Chicago
Van Poel, Esther, Jean-Baptist Vandeneede, and Els Clays. 2018. “Work Ability in Nursing: The Role of Relative Heart Rate Reserve and Work-related Stress.” In Employability in the 21st Century, Congress Abstracts.
APA
Van Poel, E., Vandeneede, J.-B., & Clays, E. (2018). Work ability in nursing: the role of relative heart rate reserve and work-related stress. Employability in the 21st Century, Congress abstracts. Presented at the 2nd International congress Employability in the 21st Century (Employability21).
Vancouver
1.
Van Poel E, Vandeneede J-B, Clays E. Work ability in nursing: the role of relative heart rate reserve and work-related stress. Employability in the 21st Century, Congress abstracts. 2018.
MLA
Van Poel, Esther, Jean-Baptist Vandeneede, and Els Clays. “Work Ability in Nursing: The Role of Relative Heart Rate Reserve and Work-related Stress.” Employability in the 21st Century, Congress Abstracts. 2018. Print.
@inproceedings{8616348,
  abstract     = {Introduction and/or Aim(s): Western countries are facing a demographic evolution which induces an increase of the retirement age. As a result, the workforce is gradually ageing and a higher number of employees suffer from health problems. Questions are raised regarding the feasibility of professions with high physical and mental workload, such as nursing. Work ability is a concept to achieve insight into nursing. First, the association between the subjective perception of current work ability and the relative heart rate reserve (\%HRR) was investigated. Second, the role of the psychosocial work environment according to the Job DemandControl-Support model, as a moderator in that association was analysed.
Methods: 83 nurses at University Hospital Ghent, including 15 men and 68 women, underwent the test procedure, containing questionnaires about the subjective perception of current work ability, using the Work Ability Score (WAS), and three different work stressors (job demands, job control and social support), using the Dutch version of the Job Content Questionnaire. Finally, objective registrations of the ambulatory heart rate were executed to calculate the mean \%HRR at work.
Results: No significant association between \%HRR and WAS was observed. Multiple linear regressions demonstrated that job control and social support were significantly and positively associated to WAS and that job demands and social support moderated the association between \%HRR and WAS. In the stratified analysis, the Spearman correlation showed a tendency towards a positive association between \%HRR and WAS among nurses with low social support.
Conclusions and/or implications: The results imply the importance of involving the psychosocial work environment in further research on the work ability of nurses, which is highlighted by the significant positive relationship of the WAS with job control and social support. Future studies are needed to verify the current statements, using a more extensive group.},
  author       = {Van Poel, Esther and Vandeneede, Jean-Baptist and Clays, Els},
  booktitle    = {Employability in the 21st Century, Congress abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Leuven, Belgium},
  title        = {Work ability in nursing: the role of relative heart rate reserve and work-related stress},
  year         = {2018},
}