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Reduction in sleep disturbances at retirement : evidence from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health

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Abstract
Although retirement involves a radical change in daily activities, income, social roles and relationships, and the transition from paid work into retirement can, therefore, be expected to affect sleep, little is known about the effects of old-age retirement on changes in sleep disturbances, and how the impact of retirement may vary by gender, age and prior working conditions. This study modelled reported sleep disturbances up to nine years before to nine years following retirement in a sample of 2,110 participants from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). Sleep disturbances over the retirement transition were modelled using repeated-measures regression analysis with Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) in relation to gender, age at retirement, working patterns (night work, full-time/part-time work), control over work hours, and psychological and physical working conditions. The analyses controlled for civil status, education level, income obtained from registers and self-rated health. Retiring from paid work was associated with decreased sleep disturbances. Greater reductions in sleep disturbances were reported by women, as well as by participants who retired before age 65 years, who were working full-time, who lacked control over their work hours and who had high psychological demands. These results, suggesting that old-age retirement from paid work is associated with reductions in disturbed sleep, pose a challenge for governments seeking to increase retirement ages.
Keywords
Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health, Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), Health(social science), Geriatrics and Gerontology, Social Psychology, work-time control, gender, retirement, sleep disturbances, psychological work demands, physical work demands

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MLA
Van de Straat, Vera, et al. “Reduction in Sleep Disturbances at Retirement : Evidence from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health.” AGEING & SOCIETY, 2019.
APA
Van de Straat, V., Platts, L. G., Vahtera, J., Westerlund, H., & Bracke, P. (2019). Reduction in sleep disturbances at retirement : evidence from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health. AGEING & SOCIETY.
Chicago author-date
Van de Straat, Vera, Loretta G. Platts, Jussi Vahtera, Hugo Westerlund, and Piet Bracke. 2019. “Reduction in Sleep Disturbances at Retirement : Evidence from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health.” AGEING & SOCIETY.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van de Straat, Vera, Loretta G. Platts, Jussi Vahtera, Hugo Westerlund, and Piet Bracke. 2019. “Reduction in Sleep Disturbances at Retirement : Evidence from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health.” AGEING & SOCIETY.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Straat V, Platts LG, Vahtera J, Westerlund H, Bracke P. Reduction in sleep disturbances at retirement : evidence from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health. AGEING & SOCIETY. 2019;
IEEE
[1]
V. Van de Straat, L. G. Platts, J. Vahtera, H. Westerlund, and P. Bracke, “Reduction in sleep disturbances at retirement : evidence from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health,” AGEING & SOCIETY, 2019.
@article{8616314,
  abstract     = {Although retirement involves a radical change in daily activities, income, social roles and
relationships, and the transition from paid work into retirement can, therefore, be
expected to affect sleep, little is known about the effects of old-age retirement on changes
in sleep disturbances, and how the impact of retirement may vary by gender, age and prior
working conditions. This study modelled reported sleep disturbances up to nine years
before to nine years following retirement in a sample of 2,110 participants from the
Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). Sleep disturbances over
the retirement transition were modelled using repeated-measures regression analysis
with Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) in relation to gender, age at retirement,
working patterns (night work, full-time/part-time work), control over work hours, and
psychological and physical working conditions. The analyses controlled for civil status,
education level, income obtained from registers and self-rated health. Retiring from paid work was associated with decreased sleep disturbances. Greater reductions in sleep disturbances were reported by women, as well as by participants who retired before age 65 years, who were working full-time, who lacked control over their work hours and who had high psychological demands. These results, suggesting that old-age retirement from paid work is associated with reductions in disturbed sleep, pose a challenge for governments seeking to increase retirement ages.},
  author       = {Van de Straat, Vera and Platts, Loretta G. and Vahtera, Jussi and Westerlund, Hugo and Bracke, Piet},
  issn         = {0144-686X},
  journal      = {AGEING & SOCIETY},
  keywords     = {Public Health,Environmental and Occupational Health,Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous),Health(social science),Geriatrics and Gerontology,Social Psychology,work-time control,gender,retirement,sleep disturbances,psychological work demands,physical work demands},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Reduction in sleep disturbances at retirement : evidence from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0144686x19000515},
  year         = {2019},
}

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