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Abstract
Study Objectives: To explore impairments in social functioning in children with narcolepsy compared to healthy children. Methods: Parents of 53 pediatric patients with narcolepsy type 1 and 64 matched healthy children completed the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18 (CBCL 6-18). Results: Patients scored significantly higher on the total score of the SRS (median 56, interquartile range [IQR] 23.5) compared to controls (median 44.5, IQR 8.5, U = 797.0, p < 0.001). Patients also scored higher on the sum of the CBCL 6-18 subscales indicative of social functioning (Withdrawn/Depressed, Social Problems, and Thought Problems; median 183, IQR 30.5) compared to controls (median 155, IQR 13, U = 500.0, p < 0.001). A total of 24 patients (45.3%) reported at least mild-to-moderate difficulties in social functioning compared to seven controls (10.9%, chi(2) = 17.165, p < 0.001). Eleven patients (20.8%) and only one control (1.6%) had T scores above 75, which points to severely impaired social functioning (chi(2) = 11.602, p = 0.001). Within the patient group, girls reported mild-to-moderate difficulties in social functioning significantly more often compared to boys on the SRS (77.8% versus 28.6%, chi(2) = 17.560, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Impaired social functioning is common in children with narcolepsy type 1, especially in girls. Questionnaires such as the SRS and the CBCL 6-18 may help in early detection of social problems in pediatric narcolepsy. Recognition of these problems could be valuable in the management of young people with narcolepsy.
Keywords
narcolepsy, NT1, pediatric, social, behavior, Social Responsiveness Scale, Child Behavior Checklist, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY, BEHAVIOR, AUTISM, HYPOCRETIN/OREXIN, DISORDERS, SPECTRUM, IDENTIFICATION, DIAGNOSIS, NEURONS

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Quaedackers, Laury et al. “Impaired Social Functioning in Children with Narcolepsy.” SLEEP 42.2 (2019): n. pag. Print.
APA
Quaedackers, L., van Gilst, M. M., van Mierlo, P., Lammers, G.-J., Dhondt, K., Amesz, P., Peeters, E., et al. (2019). Impaired social functioning in children with narcolepsy. SLEEP, 42(2).
Chicago author-date
Quaedackers, Laury, Merel M van Gilst, Petra van Mierlo, Gert-Jan Lammers, Karlien Dhondt, Pauline Amesz, Els Peeters, et al. 2019. “Impaired Social Functioning in Children with Narcolepsy.” Sleep 42 (2).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Quaedackers, Laury, Merel M van Gilst, Petra van Mierlo, Gert-Jan Lammers, Karlien Dhondt, Pauline Amesz, Els Peeters, Danielle Hendriks, Nele Vandenbussche, Sigrid Pillen, and Sebastiaan Overeem. 2019. “Impaired Social Functioning in Children with Narcolepsy.” Sleep 42 (2).
Vancouver
1.
Quaedackers L, van Gilst MM, van Mierlo P, Lammers G-J, Dhondt K, Amesz P, et al. Impaired social functioning in children with narcolepsy. SLEEP. Oxford University Press (OUP); 2019;42(2).
IEEE
[1]
L. Quaedackers et al., “Impaired social functioning in children with narcolepsy,” SLEEP, vol. 42, no. 2, 2019.
@article{8613654,
  abstract     = {Study Objectives: To explore impairments in social functioning in children with narcolepsy compared to healthy children. 
Methods: Parents of 53 pediatric patients with narcolepsy type 1 and 64 matched healthy children completed the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18 (CBCL 6-18). 
Results: Patients scored significantly higher on the total score of the SRS (median 56, interquartile range [IQR] 23.5) compared to controls (median 44.5, IQR 8.5, U = 797.0, p < 0.001). Patients also scored higher on the sum of the CBCL 6-18 subscales indicative of social functioning (Withdrawn/Depressed, Social Problems, and Thought Problems; median 183, IQR 30.5) compared to controls (median 155, IQR 13, U = 500.0, p < 0.001). A total of 24 patients (45.3%) reported at least mild-to-moderate difficulties in social functioning compared to seven controls (10.9%, chi(2) = 17.165, p < 0.001). Eleven patients (20.8%) and only one control (1.6%) had T scores above 75, which points to severely impaired social functioning (chi(2) = 11.602, p = 0.001). Within the patient group, girls reported mild-to-moderate difficulties in social functioning significantly more often compared to boys on the SRS (77.8% versus 28.6%, chi(2) = 17.560, p < 0.001). 
Conclusions: Impaired social functioning is common in children with narcolepsy type 1, especially in girls. Questionnaires such as the SRS and the CBCL 6-18 may help in early detection of social problems in pediatric narcolepsy. Recognition of these problems could be valuable in the management of young people with narcolepsy.},
  articleno    = {zsy228},
  author       = {Quaedackers, Laury and van Gilst, Merel M and van Mierlo, Petra and Lammers, Gert-Jan and Dhondt, Karlien and Amesz, Pauline and Peeters, Els and Hendriks, Danielle and Vandenbussche, Nele and Pillen, Sigrid and Overeem, Sebastiaan},
  issn         = {1550-9109},
  journal      = {SLEEP},
  keywords     = {narcolepsy,NT1,pediatric,social,behavior,Social Responsiveness Scale,Child Behavior Checklist,QUALITY-OF-LIFE,PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY,BEHAVIOR,AUTISM,HYPOCRETIN/OREXIN,DISORDERS,SPECTRUM,IDENTIFICATION,DIAGNOSIS,NEURONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {6},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
  title        = {Impaired social functioning in children with narcolepsy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsy228},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2019},
}

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