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Impact of modified gelatin on valvular microtissues

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A significant challenge in the field of tissue engineering is the biofabrication of three-dimensional (3D) functional tissues with direct applications in organ-on-a-chip systems and future organ engineering. Multicellular valvular microtissues can be used as building blocks for the formation of larger scale valvular macrotissues. Yet, for the controlled biofabrication of 3D macrotissues with predefined complex shapes, directed assembly of microtissues through bioprinting is needed. This study aimed to investigate if modified gelatin is an instructive material for valvular microtissues. Valvular microtissues were encapsulated in modified gelatin hydrogels and cross-linked in the presence of a photoinitiator (Irgacure 2959 or VA-086). Hydrogel properties were determined, and valvular interstitial cell functions like phenotype, proliferation, migration, mRNA expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, ECM deposition, and tissue fusion were characterized by histochemical stainings and RT-qPCR. Encapsulated microtissues remained viable, produced heart valve-related ECM components, and remained in a quiescent state. However, encapsulation induced some changes in ECM formation and gene expression. Encapsulated microtissues showed lower remodeling capacity and increased expression levels of Col I/V, elastin, hyaluronan, biglycan, decorin, and Sox9 compared with nonencapsulated microtissues. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that proliferation, migration, and tissue fusion was more pronounced in softer gels. In general, we evidenced that modified gelatin is an instructive material for physiologically relevant valvular microtissues and provided a proof of concept for the formation of larger valvular tissue by assembling microtissues at random in soft gels.

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Chicago
Roosens, Annelies, Yohana Permatasari Handoyo, Peter Dubruel, and Heidi Declercq. 2019. “Impact of Modified Gelatin on Valvular Microtissues.” Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.
APA
Roosens, Annelies, Handoyo, Y. P., Dubruel, P., & Declercq, H. (2019). Impact of modified gelatin on valvular microtissues. JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE.
Vancouver
1.
Roosens A, Handoyo YP, Dubruel P, Declercq H. Impact of modified gelatin on valvular microtissues. JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE. 2019;
MLA
Roosens, Annelies et al. “Impact of Modified Gelatin on Valvular Microtissues.” JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE (2019): n. pag. Print.
@article{8613577,
  abstract     = {A significant challenge in the field of tissue engineering is the biofabrication of three-dimensional (3D) functional tissues with direct applications in organ-on-a-chip systems and future organ engineering. Multicellular valvular microtissues can be used as building blocks for the formation of larger scale valvular macrotissues. Yet, for the controlled biofabrication of 3D macrotissues with predefined complex shapes, directed assembly of microtissues through bioprinting is needed. This study aimed to investigate if modified gelatin is an instructive material for valvular microtissues. Valvular microtissues were encapsulated in modified gelatin hydrogels and cross-linked in the presence of a photoinitiator (Irgacure 2959 or VA-086). Hydrogel properties were determined, and valvular interstitial cell functions like phenotype, proliferation, migration, mRNA expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, ECM deposition, and tissue fusion were characterized by histochemical stainings and RT-qPCR. Encapsulated microtissues remained viable, produced heart valve-related ECM components, and remained in a quiescent state. However, encapsulation induced some changes in ECM formation and gene expression. Encapsulated microtissues showed lower remodeling capacity and increased expression levels of Col I/V, elastin, hyaluronan, biglycan, decorin, and Sox9 compared with nonencapsulated microtissues. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that proliferation, migration, and tissue fusion was more pronounced in softer gels. In general, we evidenced that modified gelatin is an instructive material for physiologically relevant valvular microtissues and provided a proof of concept for the formation of larger valvular tissue by assembling microtissues at random in soft gels.},
  author       = {Roosens, Annelies and Handoyo, Yohana Permatasari and Dubruel, Peter and Declercq, Heidi},
  issn         = {1932-6254},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Impact of modified gelatin on valvular microtissues},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/term.2825},
  year         = {2019},
}

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