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Does historic construction suffer or benefit from the urban heat island effect in Ghent and global warming across Europe?

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Abstract
Renovating historical buildings with valuable facades often includes interior retrofitting, perhaps entailing an increased durability risk. However, the urban heat island effect and the ongoing climate change might mitigate the severity of frost action and mould growth. By means of heat air moisture (HAM) simulations in Delphin, this study evaluates interior retrofitting of solid masonry on three scales. First, the sensitivity to the intra-urban climatic differences of the freeze-thaw cycles in Ghent is analysed. Secondly, the spatial pattern of freeze-thaw behaviour across Europe is assessed. Finally, the influence of observed climate change on the European freeze-thaw pattern is investigated. A decreasing number of critical freeze-thaw cycles is found when comparing the rural area with the city centre of Ghent. Furthermore, due to climate change, the number of freeze-thaw cycles across Europe generally decreases as well, except at northern latitudes exposed to increased wind-driven rain loads.
Keywords
heat air moisture (HAM) simulations, solid historical masonry, retrofit, urban heat island, climate change, MASONRY WALLS, MODEL

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Citation

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MLA
Vandemeulebroucke, Isabeau, et al. “Does Historic Construction Suffer or Benefit from the Urban Heat Island Effect in Ghent and Global Warming across Europe?” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, vol. 46, no. 11, 2019, pp. 1032–42, doi:10.1139/cjce-2018-0594.
APA
Vandemeulebroucke, I., Calle, K., Caluwaerts, S., De Kock, T., & Van Den Bossche, N. (2019). Does historic construction suffer or benefit from the urban heat island effect in Ghent and global warming across Europe? CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, 46(11), 1032–1042. https://doi.org/10.1139/cjce-2018-0594
Chicago author-date
Vandemeulebroucke, Isabeau, Klaas Calle, Steven Caluwaerts, Tim De Kock, and Nathan Van Den Bossche. 2019. “Does Historic Construction Suffer or Benefit from the Urban Heat Island Effect in Ghent and Global Warming across Europe?” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 46 (11): 1032–42. https://doi.org/10.1139/cjce-2018-0594.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vandemeulebroucke, Isabeau, Klaas Calle, Steven Caluwaerts, Tim De Kock, and Nathan Van Den Bossche. 2019. “Does Historic Construction Suffer or Benefit from the Urban Heat Island Effect in Ghent and Global Warming across Europe?” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 46 (11): 1032–1042. doi:10.1139/cjce-2018-0594.
Vancouver
1.
Vandemeulebroucke I, Calle K, Caluwaerts S, De Kock T, Van Den Bossche N. Does historic construction suffer or benefit from the urban heat island effect in Ghent and global warming across Europe? CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 2019;46(11):1032–42.
IEEE
[1]
I. Vandemeulebroucke, K. Calle, S. Caluwaerts, T. De Kock, and N. Van Den Bossche, “Does historic construction suffer or benefit from the urban heat island effect in Ghent and global warming across Europe?,” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, vol. 46, no. 11, pp. 1032–1042, 2019.
@article{8610791,
  abstract     = {{Renovating historical buildings with valuable facades often includes interior retrofitting, perhaps entailing an increased durability risk. However, the urban heat island effect and the ongoing climate change might mitigate the severity of frost action and mould growth. By means of heat air moisture (HAM) simulations in Delphin, this study evaluates interior retrofitting of solid masonry on three scales. First, the sensitivity to the intra-urban climatic differences of the freeze-thaw cycles in Ghent is analysed. Secondly, the spatial pattern of freeze-thaw behaviour across Europe is assessed. Finally, the influence of observed climate change on the European freeze-thaw pattern is investigated. A decreasing number of critical freeze-thaw cycles is found when comparing the rural area with the city centre of Ghent. Furthermore, due to climate change, the number of freeze-thaw cycles across Europe generally decreases as well, except at northern latitudes exposed to increased wind-driven rain loads.}},
  author       = {{Vandemeulebroucke, Isabeau and Calle, Klaas and Caluwaerts, Steven and De Kock, Tim and Van Den Bossche, Nathan}},
  issn         = {{0315-1468}},
  journal      = {{CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING}},
  keywords     = {{heat air moisture (HAM) simulations,solid historical masonry,retrofit,urban heat island,climate change,MASONRY WALLS,MODEL}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{11}},
  pages        = {{1032--1042}},
  title        = {{Does historic construction suffer or benefit from the urban heat island effect in Ghent and global warming across Europe?}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/cjce-2018-0594}},
  volume       = {{46}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}

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