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Synthetic carbohydrate biomaterials for innate immune-engineering

Ruben De Coen (UGent)
(2019)
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(UGent)
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Abstract
Cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death, responsible for one in six deaths globally according to the WHO. Until recently cancer treatment was founded on three classical pillars: surgical removal of tumors if possible (1), often in combination with high energy X-ray radiotherapy (2) and/or chemotherapeutics (3).1 But faced with serious limitations including unresponsive neoplasms, very moderate results, severe side effects, huge comorbidities, and lack of specificity, scientific research was pushed to devise more effective therapies. By looking into the underlying mechanisms that caused cancer, new treatment options have emerged. Amongst these, hormone therapy and targeted therapies were introduced in the past decades to tackle a select group of specific malignancies. Recent insights in the immuno-oncology field sparked the development of cancer immunotherapy. Here the mechanisms on which tumor cells rely to actively evade immune surveillance and escape cell death have led to a plethora of new therapies that make use of the patient’s own immune system. Cancer immunotherapy has revolutionized the oncology field, creating new and better therapeutic avenues for patients suffering neoplasms that are sometimes unresponsive to more traditional treatments. Although immune-based therapies have been at the origin of spectacular remissions, it still faces significant drawbacks. These include life-threatening side effects, 20-30 % response rates in treated patients and high treatment costs. Hence, there is an urgent need for more effective immunotherapy to either improve upon or complement the current state of the art. In this dissertation, we focused on the design of novel carbohydrate based biomaterials to help engineer an immune response directed against cancer cells. We investigated the potential of mannosylated nanogels as a potential carrier for in vivo cancer vaccination and antibody-recruiting polymers that can act as an in situ cancer vaccine.
Keywords
Carbohydrates, Immunotherapy, Cancer

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Coen, Ruben. 2019. “Synthetic Carbohydrate Biomaterials for Innate Immune-engineering”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
APA
De Coen, R. (2019). Synthetic carbohydrate biomaterials for innate immune-engineering. Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
De Coen R. Synthetic carbohydrate biomaterials for innate immune-engineering. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; 2019.
MLA
De Coen, Ruben. “Synthetic Carbohydrate Biomaterials for Innate Immune-engineering.” 2019 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{8610549,
  abstract     = {Cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death, responsible for one in six deaths globally according to the WHO. Until recently cancer treatment was founded on three classical pillars: surgical removal of tumors if possible (1), often in combination with high energy X-ray radiotherapy (2) and/or chemotherapeutics (3).1 But faced with serious limitations including unresponsive neoplasms, very moderate results, severe side effects, huge comorbidities, and lack of specificity, scientific research was pushed to devise more effective therapies. By looking into the underlying mechanisms that caused cancer, new treatment options have emerged. Amongst these, hormone therapy and targeted therapies were introduced in the past decades to tackle a select group of specific malignancies.
Recent insights in the immuno-oncology field sparked the development of cancer immunotherapy. Here the mechanisms on which tumor cells rely to actively evade immune surveillance and escape cell death have led to a plethora of new therapies that make use of the patient’s own immune system. 
Cancer immunotherapy has revolutionized the oncology field, creating new and better therapeutic avenues for patients suffering neoplasms that are sometimes unresponsive to more traditional treatments. Although immune-based therapies have been at the origin of spectacular remissions, it still faces significant drawbacks. These include life-threatening side effects, 20-30 % response rates in treated patients and high treatment costs. Hence, there is an urgent need for more effective immunotherapy to either improve upon or complement the current state of the art. 
In this dissertation, we focused on the design of novel carbohydrate based biomaterials to help engineer an immune response directed against cancer cells. We investigated the potential of mannosylated nanogels as a potential carrier for in vivo cancer vaccination and antibody-recruiting polymers that can act as an in situ cancer vaccine.},
  author       = {De Coen, Ruben},
  keywords     = {Carbohydrates,Immunotherapy,Cancer},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {303},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Synthetic carbohydrate biomaterials for innate immune-engineering},
  year         = {2019},
}