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Hoogvliegers onder de nachtvlinders

Pieter Vangansbeke (UGent) , Pallieter De Smedt (UGent) , Luc Willems (UGent) and Jan Mertens (UGent)
(2019) Natuur.focus. 18(1). p.10-18
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Abstract
We sampled macro-moths on a weekly basis for 14 months on a tower in an ancient deciduous forest in Belgium. Light and bait traps were used at ground level and at 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 m height in the forest. We analysed total moth abundance along the vertical gradient and distribution patterns of individual species and families, using generalised linear mixed-effects models. We demonstrated a strong vertical stratification, resulting in distinct moth communities at different heights. The observed patterns were non-random, but related to specific response traits of the species. Notably, we found large differences between families; whereas Geometridae-moths were much more abundant at ground level, Noctuidae showed a preference for both the ground level and the canopy layer. Comparing species-specific patterns within families revealed strong differences between species. We welcome future research to further document vertical stratification patterns and unravel the different underlying mechanisms.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vangansbeke, Pieter, Pallieter De Smedt, Luc Willems, and Jan Mertens. 2019. “Hoogvliegers Onder De Nachtvlinders.” Natuur.focus 18 (1): 10–18.
APA
Vangansbeke, P., De Smedt, P., Willems, L., & Mertens, J. (2019). Hoogvliegers onder de nachtvlinders. Natuur.focus, 18(1), 10–18.
Vancouver
1.
Vangansbeke P, De Smedt P, Willems L, Mertens J. Hoogvliegers onder de nachtvlinders. Natuur.focus. 2019;18(1):10–8.
MLA
Vangansbeke, Pieter et al. “Hoogvliegers Onder De Nachtvlinders.” Natuur.focus 18.1 (2019): 10–18. Print.
@article{8609186,
  abstract     = {We sampled macro-moths on a weekly basis for 14 months on a tower
in an ancient deciduous forest in Belgium. Light and bait traps were
used at ground level and at 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 m height in the forest.
We analysed total moth abundance along the vertical gradient and distribution
patterns of individual species and families, using generalised
linear mixed-effects models. We demonstrated a strong vertical stratification,
resulting in distinct moth communities at different heights. The
observed patterns were non-random, but related to specific response
traits of the species. Notably, we found large differences between families;
whereas Geometridae-moths were much more abundant at ground
level, Noctuidae showed a preference for both the ground level and the
canopy layer. Comparing species-specific patterns within families revealed
strong differences between species. We welcome future research to
further document vertical stratification patterns and unravel the different
underlying mechanisms.},
  author       = {Vangansbeke, Pieter and De Smedt, Pallieter and Willems, Luc and Mertens, Jan},
  journal      = {Natuur.focus},
  language     = {dut},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {10--18},
  title        = {Hoogvliegers onder de nachtvlinders},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2019},
}