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Asymmetric spatial processing under cognitive load

Lien Naert (UGent) , Mario Bonato (UGent) and Wim Fias (UGent)
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Abstract
Spatial attention allows us to selectively process information within a certain location in space. Despite the vast literature on spatial attention, the effect of cognitive load on spatial processing is still not fully understood. In this study we added cognitive load to a spatial processing task, so as to see whether it would differentially impact upon the processing of visual information in the left versus the right hemispace. The main paradigm consisted of a detection task that was performed during the maintenance interval of a verbal working memory task. We found that increasing cognitive working memory load had a more negative impact on detecting targets presented on the left side compared to those on the right side. The strength of the load effect correlated with the strength of the interaction on an individual level. The implications of an asymmetric attentional bias with a relative disadvantage for the left (vs the right) hemispace under high verbal working memory (WM) load are discussed.
Keywords
WORKING-MEMORY, PERCEPTUAL LOAD, VISUAL-ATTENTION, TARGET DETECTION, TOP-DOWN, NEGLECT, MODULATION, ANXIETY, LOOKING, SPEECH, spatial attention, verbal working memory, cognitive load, detection, task, visuo-spatial processing

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Naert, Lien, Mario Bonato, and Wim Fias. “Asymmetric Spatial Processing Under Cognitive Load.” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY 9 (2018): n. pag. Print.
APA
Naert, L., Bonato, M., & Fias, W. (2018). Asymmetric spatial processing under cognitive load. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 9.
Chicago author-date
Naert, Lien, Mario Bonato, and Wim Fias. 2018. “Asymmetric Spatial Processing Under Cognitive Load.” Frontiers in Psychology 9.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Naert, Lien, Mario Bonato, and Wim Fias. 2018. “Asymmetric Spatial Processing Under Cognitive Load.” Frontiers in Psychology 9.
Vancouver
1.
Naert L, Bonato M, Fias W. Asymmetric spatial processing under cognitive load. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 2018;9.
IEEE
[1]
L. Naert, M. Bonato, and W. Fias, “Asymmetric spatial processing under cognitive load,” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 9, 2018.
@article{8608833,
  abstract     = {Spatial attention allows us to selectively process information within a certain location in space. Despite the vast literature on spatial attention, the effect of cognitive load on spatial processing is still not fully understood. In this study we added cognitive load to a spatial processing task, so as to see whether it would differentially impact upon the processing of visual information in the left versus the right hemispace. The main paradigm consisted of a detection task that was performed during the maintenance interval of a verbal working memory task. We found that increasing cognitive working memory load had a more negative impact on detecting targets presented on the left side compared to those on the right side. The strength of the load effect correlated with the strength of the interaction on an individual level. The implications of an asymmetric attentional bias with a relative disadvantage for the left (vs the right) hemispace under high verbal working memory (WM) load are discussed.},
  articleno    = {583},
  author       = {Naert, Lien and Bonato, Mario and Fias, Wim},
  issn         = {1664-1078},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {WORKING-MEMORY,PERCEPTUAL LOAD,VISUAL-ATTENTION,TARGET DETECTION,TOP-DOWN,NEGLECT,MODULATION,ANXIETY,LOOKING,SPEECH,spatial attention,verbal working memory,cognitive load,detection,task,visuo-spatial processing},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {Asymmetric spatial processing under cognitive load},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00583},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2018},
}

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