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Assessment of short-term aquifer thermal energy storage for demand-side management perspectives: Experimental and numerical developments

(2019) Applied Energy. 242. p.534-546
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Abstract
In the context of demand-side management and geothermal energy production, our proposal is to store thermal energy in shallow alluvial aquifers at shorter frequencies than classical seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage. We first conducted a one-week experiment in a shallow alluvial aquifer, which is characterized by a slow ambient groundwater flow, to assess its potential for thermal energy storage and recovery. This experiment has shown that up to 90% of the stored thermal energy can be recovered and would therefore suggest that aquifer thermal energy storage could be considered for demand-side management applications. We then conceptualized, developed, and calibrated a deterministic 3D groundwater flow and heat transport numerical model representing our study site, and we simulated 77 different scenarios to further assess this potential. This has allowed us to demonstrate that low-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (temperature differences of −4 K for precooling and 3, 6, and 11 K for preheating) is efficient with energy recovery rates ranging from 78 to 87%, in a single aquifer thermal energy storage cycle. High-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (temperature differences between 35 and 65 K) presents lower energy recovery rates, from 53 to 71%, with all other parameters remaining equals. Energy recovery rates decrease with increasing storage duration and this decrease is faster for higher temperatures. Retrieving directly useful heat (without upgrading with a groundwater heat pump) using only a single storage and recovery cycle appears to be complicated. Nevertheless, there is room for aquifer thermal energy storage optimization in space and time with regard to improving both the energy recovery rates and the recovered absolute temperatures.
Keywords
Aquifer thermal energy storage, Demand-side management, Energy efficiency, Hydrogeological modeling, Geothermics, Geophysics

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Schepper, Guillaume, Claire Paulus, Pierre-Yves Bolly, Thomas Hermans, Nolwenn Lesparre, and Tanguy Robert. 2019. “Assessment of Short-term Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage for Demand-side Management Perspectives: Experimental and Numerical Developments.” Applied Energy 242: 534–546.
APA
De Schepper, G., Paulus, C., Bolly, P.-Y., Hermans, T., Lesparre, N., & Robert, T. (2019). Assessment of short-term aquifer thermal energy storage for demand-side management perspectives: Experimental and numerical developments. Applied Energy, 242, 534–546.
Vancouver
1.
De Schepper G, Paulus C, Bolly P-Y, Hermans T, Lesparre N, Robert T. Assessment of short-term aquifer thermal energy storage for demand-side management perspectives: Experimental and numerical developments. Applied Energy. Elsevier BV; 2019;242:534–46.
MLA
De Schepper, Guillaume et al. “Assessment of Short-term Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage for Demand-side Management Perspectives: Experimental and Numerical Developments.” Applied Energy 242 (2019): 534–546. Print.
@article{8608335,
  abstract     = {In the context of demand-side management and geothermal energy production, our proposal is to store thermal energy in shallow alluvial aquifers at shorter frequencies than classical seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage. We first conducted a one-week experiment in a shallow alluvial aquifer, which is characterized by a slow ambient groundwater flow, to assess its potential for thermal energy storage and recovery. This experiment has shown that up to 90\% of the stored thermal energy can be recovered and would therefore suggest that aquifer thermal energy storage could be considered for demand-side management applications. We then conceptualized, developed, and calibrated a deterministic 3D groundwater flow and heat transport numerical model representing our study site, and we simulated 77 different scenarios to further assess this potential. This has allowed us to demonstrate that low-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (temperature differences of \ensuremath{-}4 K for precooling and 3, 6, and 11 K for preheating) is efficient with energy recovery rates ranging from 78 to 87\%, in a single aquifer thermal energy storage cycle. High-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (temperature differences between 35 and 65 K) presents lower energy recovery rates, from 53 to 71\%, with all other parameters remaining equals. Energy recovery rates decrease with increasing storage duration and this decrease is faster for higher temperatures. Retrieving directly useful heat (without upgrading with a groundwater heat pump) using only a single storage and recovery cycle appears to be complicated. Nevertheless, there is room for aquifer thermal energy storage optimization in space and time with regard to improving both the energy recovery rates and the recovered absolute temperatures.},
  author       = {De Schepper, Guillaume and Paulus, Claire and Bolly, Pierre-Yves and Hermans, Thomas and Lesparre, Nolwenn and Robert, Tanguy},
  issn         = {0306-2619},
  journal      = {Applied Energy},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {534--546},
  publisher    = {Elsevier BV},
  title        = {Assessment of short-term aquifer thermal energy storage for demand-side management perspectives: Experimental and numerical developments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2019.03.103},
  volume       = {242},
  year         = {2019},
}

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