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Transient and sustained control mechanisms supporting novel instructed behavior

(2019) CEREBRAL CORTEX. 29(9). p.3948-3960
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Abstract
The success of humans in novel environments is partially supported by our ability to implement new task procedures via instructions. This complex skill has been associated with the activity of control-related brain areas. Current models link fronto-parietal and cingulo-opercular networks with transient and sustained modes of cognitive control, based on observations during repetitive task settings or rest. The current study extends this dual model to novel instructed tasks. We employed a mixed design and an instruction-following task to extract phasic and tonic brain signals associated with the encoding and implementation of novel verbal rules. We also performed a representation similarity analysis to capture consistency in task-set encoding within trial epochs. Our findings show that both networks are involved while following novel instructions: transiently, during the implementation of the instruction, and in a sustained fashion, across novel trials blocks. Moreover, the multivariate results showed that task representations in the cingulo-opercular network were more stable than in the fronto-parietal one. Our data extend the dual model of cognitive control to novel demanding situations, highlighting the high flexibility of control-related regions in adopting different temporal profiles.
Keywords
cingulo-opercular network, cognitive control, fronto-parietal network, instructed behavior, mixed design, HUMAN BRAIN, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, COGNITIVE CONTROL, TASK-SET, NETWORKS, FRONTOPARIETAL, IMPLEMENTATION, CONNECTIVITY, INTERFERENCE, RULE

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Palenciano, Ana F., et al. “Transient and Sustained Control Mechanisms Supporting Novel Instructed Behavior.” CEREBRAL CORTEX, vol. 29, no. 9, 2019, pp. 3948–60.
APA
Palenciano, A. F., Gonzalez-Garcia, C., Arco, J. E., & Ruz, M. (2019). Transient and sustained control mechanisms supporting novel instructed behavior. CEREBRAL CORTEX, 29(9), 3948–3960.
Chicago author-date
Palenciano, Ana F., Carlos Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan E. Arco, and María Ruz. 2019. “Transient and Sustained Control Mechanisms Supporting Novel Instructed Behavior.” CEREBRAL CORTEX 29 (9): 3948–60.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Palenciano, Ana F., Carlos Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan E. Arco, and María Ruz. 2019. “Transient and Sustained Control Mechanisms Supporting Novel Instructed Behavior.” CEREBRAL CORTEX 29 (9): 3948–3960.
Vancouver
1.
Palenciano AF, Gonzalez-Garcia C, Arco JE, Ruz M. Transient and sustained control mechanisms supporting novel instructed behavior. CEREBRAL CORTEX. 2019;29(9):3948–60.
IEEE
[1]
A. F. Palenciano, C. Gonzalez-Garcia, J. E. Arco, and M. Ruz, “Transient and sustained control mechanisms supporting novel instructed behavior,” CEREBRAL CORTEX, vol. 29, no. 9, pp. 3948–3960, 2019.
@article{8607934,
  abstract     = {The success of humans in novel environments is partially supported by our ability to implement new task procedures via instructions. This complex skill has been associated with the activity of control-related brain areas. Current models link fronto-parietal and cingulo-opercular networks with transient and sustained modes of cognitive control, based on observations during repetitive task settings or rest. The current study extends this dual model to novel instructed tasks. We employed a mixed design and an instruction-following task to extract phasic and tonic brain signals associated with the encoding and implementation of novel verbal rules. We also performed a representation similarity analysis to capture consistency in task-set encoding within trial epochs. Our findings show that both networks are involved while following novel instructions: transiently, during the implementation of the instruction, and in a sustained fashion, across novel trials blocks. Moreover, the multivariate results showed that task representations in the cingulo-opercular network were more stable than in the fronto-parietal one. Our data extend the dual model of cognitive control to novel demanding situations, highlighting the high flexibility of control-related regions in adopting different temporal profiles.},
  author       = {Palenciano, Ana F. and Gonzalez-Garcia, Carlos and Arco, Juan E. and Ruz, María},
  issn         = {1047-3211},
  journal      = {CEREBRAL CORTEX},
  keywords     = {cingulo-opercular network,cognitive control,fronto-parietal network,instructed behavior,mixed design,HUMAN BRAIN,PREFRONTAL CORTEX,COGNITIVE CONTROL,TASK-SET,NETWORKS,FRONTOPARIETAL,IMPLEMENTATION,CONNECTIVITY,INTERFERENCE,RULE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {3948--3960},
  title        = {Transient and sustained control mechanisms supporting novel instructed behavior},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhy273},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2019},
}

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