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Attentional bias to pain-related information : a meta-analysis of dot-probe studies

(2018) HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW. 12(4). p.419-436
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Abstract
Studies investigating attentional biases towards pain information vary widely in both design and results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the degree to which attentional biases towards pain occur when measured with the dot-probe task. A total of 2168 references were screened, resulting in a final sample of 4466 participants from 52 articles. Participants were grouped according to pain experience: chronic pain, acute pain, anticipating experimental/procedural pain, social concern for pain, or healthy people. In general, results revealed a significant, but small bias towards pain words (d = 0.136), and pain pictures (d = 0.110) in chronic pain patients, but not in those with acute pain, those anticipating pain, or healthy people. Follow-up analyses revealed an attentional bias towards sensory pain words in the chronic pain group (d = 0.198), and the acute pain group (d = 0.303), but not other groups. In contrast, attentional biases towards affective pain stimuli were not significant for any pain groups. This meta-analysis found support for attentional biases towards sensory pain stimuli in patients with chronic pain in comparison to healthy individuals across a range of common parameters. Future researchers need to consider task design when seeking to optimally measure pain-relevant attentional biases.
Keywords
COGNITIVE BIAS, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, STROOP INTERFERENCE, VISUAL-ATTENTION, FEAR-AVOIDANCE, STIMULI, THREAT, ANXIETY, MODEL, WORDS, Pain, attentional bias, meta-analysis, dot-probe

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Citation

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MLA
Todd, Jemma, et al. “Attentional Bias to Pain-Related Information : A Meta-Analysis of Dot-Probe Studies.” HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, vol. 12, no. 4, Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd, 2018, pp. 419–36, doi:10.1080/17437199.2018.1521729.
APA
Todd, J., Van Ryckeghem, D., Sharpe, L., & Crombez, G. (2018). Attentional bias to pain-related information : a meta-analysis of dot-probe studies. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, 12(4), 419–436. https://doi.org/10.1080/17437199.2018.1521729
Chicago author-date
Todd, Jemma, Dimitri Van Ryckeghem, Louise Sharpe, and Geert Crombez. 2018. “Attentional Bias to Pain-Related Information : A Meta-Analysis of Dot-Probe Studies.” HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW 12 (4): 419–36. https://doi.org/10.1080/17437199.2018.1521729.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Todd, Jemma, Dimitri Van Ryckeghem, Louise Sharpe, and Geert Crombez. 2018. “Attentional Bias to Pain-Related Information : A Meta-Analysis of Dot-Probe Studies.” HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW 12 (4): 419–436. doi:10.1080/17437199.2018.1521729.
Vancouver
1.
Todd J, Van Ryckeghem D, Sharpe L, Crombez G. Attentional bias to pain-related information : a meta-analysis of dot-probe studies. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW. 2018;12(4):419–36.
IEEE
[1]
J. Todd, D. Van Ryckeghem, L. Sharpe, and G. Crombez, “Attentional bias to pain-related information : a meta-analysis of dot-probe studies,” HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 419–436, 2018.
@article{8606398,
  abstract     = {{Studies investigating attentional biases towards pain information vary widely in both design and results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the degree to which attentional biases towards pain occur when measured with the dot-probe task. A total of 2168 references were screened, resulting in a final sample of 4466 participants from 52 articles. Participants were grouped according to pain experience: chronic pain, acute pain, anticipating experimental/procedural pain, social concern for pain, or healthy people. In general, results revealed a significant, but small bias towards pain words (d = 0.136), and pain pictures (d = 0.110) in chronic pain patients, but not in those with acute pain, those anticipating pain, or healthy people. Follow-up analyses revealed an attentional bias towards sensory pain words in the chronic pain group (d = 0.198), and the acute pain group (d = 0.303), but not other groups. In contrast, attentional biases towards affective pain stimuli were not significant for any pain groups. This meta-analysis found support for attentional biases towards sensory pain stimuli in patients with chronic pain in comparison to healthy individuals across a range of common parameters. Future researchers need to consider task design when seeking to optimally measure pain-relevant attentional biases.}},
  author       = {{Todd, Jemma and Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri and Sharpe, Louise and Crombez, Geert}},
  issn         = {{1743-7199}},
  journal      = {{HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW}},
  keywords     = {{COGNITIVE BIAS,SELECTIVE ATTENTION,STROOP INTERFERENCE,VISUAL-ATTENTION,FEAR-AVOIDANCE,STIMULI,THREAT,ANXIETY,MODEL,WORDS,Pain,attentional bias,meta-analysis,dot-probe}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{4}},
  pages        = {{419--436}},
  publisher    = {{Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd}},
  title        = {{Attentional bias to pain-related information : a meta-analysis of dot-probe studies}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1080/17437199.2018.1521729}},
  volume       = {{12}},
  year         = {{2018}},
}

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