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Biosorption of residual cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin antineoplastic drugs in urine after chemotherapy treatment

(2018) ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 15(8). p.506-512
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Abstract
Environmental contextPlatinum complexes are widely used to treat cancer; however, these compounds are also rapidly excreted in the urine of patients and can therefore enter waterways, presenting a toxic hazard to the environment. The biopolymer chitosan was found to be an effective and fast adsorbent for capturing multiple platinum complexes currently applied in medicine. This new approach using biomaterials is proposed to treat such drug residues while at the same time recovering the valuable metal from urine. AbstractThe majority of platinum used in antineoplastic drugs is rapidly excreted through the urine. These residual platinum compounds are highly toxic, and may eventually reach the aquatic environment if not remediated. Furthermore, platinum is a precious metal that is also relatively scarce, and it is therefore also economically worthwhile to capture and recycle it. We propose that biomass-derived adsorbents would be effective for recovering platinum from diluted streams, including synthetic human urine. Compared with ultrapure water, the salts and small biomolecules present in urine pose additional competition for active binding on the biosorbents' surface. Chitosan, biochar, wood ash and granular activated carbon were found to effectively adsorb between 0.23 and 0.97mgg(-1) inorganic Pt-IV when a minimal adsorbent dose of 10gL(-1) was applied. The fastest adsorption rate was observed using chitosan (k(2)=728gmg(-1)min(-1)), followed by wood ash (k(2)=49.4gmg(-1)min(-1)) and biochar (k(2)=6.18gmg(-1)min(-1)). Substantial differences in platinum recovery were observed among inorganic Pt-IV, cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, which indicates that the adsorbate speciation is highly important for establishing a hydrometallurgical purification technique.
Keywords
CANCEROSTATIC PLATINUM COMPOUNDS, SELECTIVE RECOVERY, AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS, PRECIOUS METALS, ADSORPTION, PALLADIUM(II), SORPTION, REMOVAL, WATER, CONTAMINANTS, adsorption, hospital waste water, resource recovery, speciation

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Citation

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Chicago
Folens, Karel, Alebel Abebe, Jingyue Tang, Frederik Ronsse, and Gijs Du Laing. 2018. “Biosorption of Residual Cisplatin, Carboplatin and Oxaliplatin Antineoplastic Drugs in Urine After Chemotherapy Treatment.” Environmental Chemistry 15 (8): 506–512.
APA
Folens, K., Abebe, A., Tang, J., Ronsse, F., & Du Laing, G. (2018). Biosorption of residual cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin antineoplastic drugs in urine after chemotherapy treatment. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY, 15(8), 506–512.
Vancouver
1.
Folens K, Abebe A, Tang J, Ronsse F, Du Laing G. Biosorption of residual cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin antineoplastic drugs in urine after chemotherapy treatment. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. Clayton: Csiro Publishing; 2018;15(8):506–12.
MLA
Folens, Karel et al. “Biosorption of Residual Cisplatin, Carboplatin and Oxaliplatin Antineoplastic Drugs in Urine After Chemotherapy Treatment.” ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 15.8 (2018): 506–512. Print.
@article{8605539,
  abstract     = {Environmental contextPlatinum complexes are widely used to treat cancer; however, these compounds are also rapidly excreted in the urine of patients and can therefore enter waterways, presenting a toxic hazard to the environment. The biopolymer chitosan was found to be an effective and fast adsorbent for capturing multiple platinum complexes currently applied in medicine. This new approach using biomaterials is proposed to treat such drug residues while at the same time recovering the valuable metal from urine. AbstractThe majority of platinum used in antineoplastic drugs is rapidly excreted through the urine. These residual platinum compounds are highly toxic, and may eventually reach the aquatic environment if not remediated. Furthermore, platinum is a precious metal that is also relatively scarce, and it is therefore also economically worthwhile to capture and recycle it. We propose that biomass-derived adsorbents would be effective for recovering platinum from diluted streams, including synthetic human urine. Compared with ultrapure water, the salts and small biomolecules present in urine pose additional competition for active binding on the biosorbents' surface. Chitosan, biochar, wood ash and granular activated carbon were found to effectively adsorb between 0.23 and 0.97mgg(-1) inorganic Pt-IV when a minimal adsorbent dose of 10gL(-1) was applied. The fastest adsorption rate was observed using chitosan (k(2)=728gmg(-1)min(-1)), followed by wood ash (k(2)=49.4gmg(-1)min(-1)) and biochar (k(2)=6.18gmg(-1)min(-1)). Substantial differences in platinum recovery were observed among inorganic Pt-IV, cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, which indicates that the adsorbate speciation is highly important for establishing a hydrometallurgical purification technique.},
  author       = {Folens, Karel and Abebe, Alebel and Tang, Jingyue and Ronsse, Frederik and Du Laing, Gijs},
  issn         = {1448-2517},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY},
  keywords     = {CANCEROSTATIC PLATINUM COMPOUNDS,SELECTIVE RECOVERY,AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS,PRECIOUS METALS,ADSORPTION,PALLADIUM(II),SORPTION,REMOVAL,WATER,CONTAMINANTS,adsorption,hospital waste water,resource recovery,speciation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {506--512},
  publisher    = {Csiro Publishing},
  title        = {Biosorption of residual cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin antineoplastic drugs in urine after chemotherapy treatment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/EN18115},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2018},
}

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