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Long-term impact of zinc supplementation in sows: Impact on zinc status biomarkers and performance

Miriam MJ van Riet (UGent) , Emilie-Julie Bos (UGent) , Bart Ampe (UGent) , Paul Bikker, Donna Vanhauteghem (UGent) , Filip Van Bockstaele (UGent) , Pieter Cornillie (UGent) , Wim Van Den Broeck (UGent) , Gijs Du Laing (UGent) , Dominiek Maes (UGent) , et al.
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Abstract
Objectives: To evaluate the long-term impact of zinc (Zn) supplementation on performance and Zn status biomarkers in sows and on whether this possible impact depends on housing conditions. Materials and methods: Six groups of sows were allotted to group housing on two different floor types during gestation. Within each group, sows were randomly allocated to one of three diets varying in the amount of Zn supplemented (0, 50, or 100 mg added Zn per kg diet; 50% ZnO:50% organic Zn) to a basal diet containing 46.6 and 128.9 mg Zn per kg during gestation and lactation, respectively. Blood was collected at days 0, 50, 108, and 143 of every cycle and analyzed for plasma Zn and copper and serum metallothionein (MT) concentrations. After slaughter, mineral concentrations of metacarpals, liver, and abaxial horn wall were determined. Results: Dietary Zn supplementation beyond basal dietary Zn concentrations did not influence serum MT concentrations (P = .77) and Zn concentrations in blood plasma (P = .13), liver (P = .54), bone (P = .26), and horn wall (P = .39). The 100-mg Zn per kg supplemented sows had lower bodyweight, body condition score, and backfat thickness (P < .001). The lack of impact of Zn supplementation may have been (partly) attributed to the unexpected high supply of Zn through premix in the lactation diet.
Keywords
LOW DIETARY ZINC, QUANTITATIVE ZN EXCHANGE, ADULT-RATS, MICROBIAL, PHYTASE, WEANLING PIGS, DAIRY-CATTLE, TISSUE ZINC, FIELD TRIAL, WHOLE-BODY, LACTATION, swine, dietary zinc concentration, rubber top layer flooring, zinc, status biomarkers, performance

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Chicago
van Riet, Miriam MJ, Emilie-Julie Bos, Bart Ampe, Paul Bikker, Donna Vanhauteghem, Filip Van Bockstaele, Pieter Cornillie, et al. 2018. “Long-term Impact of Zinc Supplementation in Sows: Impact on Zinc Status Biomarkers and Performance.” Journal of Swine Health and Production 26 (2): 79–94.
APA
van Riet, M. M., Bos, E.-J., Ampe, B., Bikker, P., Vanhauteghem, D., Van Bockstaele, F., Cornillie, P., et al. (2018). Long-term impact of zinc supplementation in sows: Impact on zinc status biomarkers and performance. JOURNAL OF SWINE HEALTH AND PRODUCTION, 26(2), 79–94.
Vancouver
1.
van Riet MM, Bos E-J, Ampe B, Bikker P, Vanhauteghem D, Van Bockstaele F, et al. Long-term impact of zinc supplementation in sows: Impact on zinc status biomarkers and performance. JOURNAL OF SWINE HEALTH AND PRODUCTION. Perry: Amer Assoc Swine Veterinarians; 2018;26(2):79–94.
MLA
van Riet, Miriam MJ et al. “Long-term Impact of Zinc Supplementation in Sows: Impact on Zinc Status Biomarkers and Performance.” JOURNAL OF SWINE HEALTH AND PRODUCTION 26.2 (2018): 79–94. Print.
@article{8605529,
  abstract     = {Objectives: To evaluate the long-term impact of zinc (Zn) supplementation on performance and Zn status biomarkers in sows and on whether this possible impact depends on housing conditions. Materials and methods: Six groups of sows were allotted to group housing on two different floor types during gestation. Within each group, sows were randomly allocated to one of three diets varying in the amount of Zn supplemented (0, 50, or 100 mg added Zn per kg diet; 50\% ZnO:50\% organic Zn) to a basal diet containing 46.6 and 128.9 mg Zn per kg during gestation and lactation, respectively. Blood was collected at days 0, 50, 108, and 143 of every cycle and analyzed for plasma Zn and copper and serum metallothionein (MT) concentrations. After slaughter, mineral concentrations of metacarpals, liver, and abaxial horn wall were determined. Results: Dietary Zn supplementation beyond basal dietary Zn concentrations did not influence serum MT concentrations (P = .77) and Zn concentrations in blood plasma (P = .13), liver (P = .54), bone (P = .26), and horn wall (P = .39). The 100-mg Zn per kg supplemented sows had lower bodyweight, body condition score, and backfat thickness (P {\textlangle} .001). The lack of impact of Zn supplementation may have been (partly) attributed to the unexpected high supply of Zn through premix in the lactation diet.},
  author       = {van Riet, Miriam MJ and Bos, Emilie-Julie and Ampe, Bart and Bikker, Paul and Vanhauteghem, Donna and Van Bockstaele, Filip and Cornillie, Pieter and Van Den Broeck, Wim and Du Laing, Gijs and Maes, Dominiek and Tuyttens, Frank and Janssens, Geert and Millet, Sam},
  issn         = {1537-209X},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SWINE HEALTH AND PRODUCTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {79--94},
  publisher    = {Amer Assoc Swine Veterinarians},
  title        = {Long-term impact of zinc supplementation in sows: Impact on zinc status biomarkers and performance},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2018},
}

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