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Friesian horses show higher arterial blood pressure compared to Warmbloods

Lisse Vera (UGent) , Dominique De Clercq (UGent) , Glenn Van Steenkiste (UGent) , Annelies Decloedt (UGent) , Koen Chiers (UGent) and Gunther van Loon (UGent)
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Abstract
Aortic rupture is known to occur more commonly and at a different anatomical location in Friesian horses compared to Warmblood horses. Hypertension has been suggested as a potential risk factor for aortic rupture in Friesians. However, very little is known about differences in cardiovascular characteristics between both breeds. Therefore, non-invasive blood pressure values of 82 healthy Friesian horses, mean age (±standard deviation) 11.6±5.3 years, were compared with values of 72 Warmblood horses, aged 12.7±5.3 years. Systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured on the standing, non-sedated horse using a tail cuff. To correct measurements to the level of the heart base, a correction factor of 0.77mmHg was added for every cm difference in height between the tail cuff and the right atrium. Pulse pressure was calculated as the difference between SAP and DAP. The mean of five consecutive measurements was used for further analysis. Friesians showed a significantly higher SAP (143±16mmHg, p<0.001) and MAP (113±14mmHg; p<0.001) compared to Warmblood horses (133±13mmHg and 106±11mmHg, respectively). DAP did not differ significantly (94±13mmHg vs. 91±11mmHg, respectively; p=0.195). This led to a significantly higher pulse pressure in Friesians (49±12mmHg) compared to Warmblood horses (41±9mmHg) (p<0.001). These results suggest different cardiovascular characteristics between both breeds. Systolic hypertension in combination with a higher pulse pressure might be the result of a less compliant vascular system. Further research into the vascular characteristics of Friesian horses is necessary to further unravel the mechanisms leading to aortic rupture.

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Chicago
Vera, Lisse, Dominique De Clercq, Glenn Van Steenkiste, Annelies Decloedt, Koen Chiers, and Gunther van Loon. 2018. “Friesian Horses Show Higher Arterial Blood Pressure Compared to Warmbloods .” In Proceedings of the 11th European College of Equine Internal Medicine Congress.
APA
Vera, L., De Clercq, D., Van Steenkiste, G., Decloedt, A., Chiers, K., & van Loon, G. (2018). Friesian horses show higher arterial blood pressure compared to Warmbloods . Proceedings of the 11th European College of Equine Internal Medicine congress. Presented at the 11th European College of Equine Internal Medicine congress (ECEIM 2018).
Vancouver
1.
Vera L, De Clercq D, Van Steenkiste G, Decloedt A, Chiers K, van Loon G. Friesian horses show higher arterial blood pressure compared to Warmbloods . Proceedings of the 11th European College of Equine Internal Medicine congress. 2018.
MLA
Vera, Lisse et al. “Friesian Horses Show Higher Arterial Blood Pressure Compared to Warmbloods .” Proceedings of the 11th European College of Equine Internal Medicine Congress. 2018. Print.
@inproceedings{8604388,
  abstract     = {Aortic rupture is known to occur more commonly and at a different anatomical location in Friesian horses compared to Warmblood horses. Hypertension has been suggested as a potential risk factor for aortic rupture in Friesians. However, very little is known about differences in cardiovascular characteristics between both breeds. Therefore, non-invasive blood pressure values of 82 healthy Friesian horses, mean age (±standard deviation) 11.6±5.3 years, were compared with values of 72 Warmblood horses, aged 12.7±5.3 years. Systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured on the standing, non-sedated horse using a tail cuff. To correct measurements to the level of the heart base, a correction factor of 0.77mmHg was added for every cm difference in height between the tail cuff and the right atrium. Pulse pressure was calculated as the difference between SAP and DAP. The mean of five consecutive measurements was used for further analysis. Friesians showed a significantly higher SAP (143±16mmHg, p<0.001) and MAP (113±14mmHg; p<0.001) compared to Warmblood horses (133±13mmHg and 106±11mmHg, respectively). DAP did not differ significantly (94±13mmHg vs. 91±11mmHg, respectively; p=0.195). This led to a significantly higher pulse pressure in Friesians (49±12mmHg) compared to Warmblood horses (41±9mmHg) (p<0.001). These results suggest different cardiovascular characteristics between both breeds. Systolic hypertension in combination with a higher pulse pressure might be the result of a less compliant vascular system. Further research into the vascular characteristics of Friesian horses is necessary to further unravel the mechanisms leading to aortic rupture. },
  author       = {Vera, Lisse and De Clercq, Dominique and Van Steenkiste, Glenn and Decloedt, Annelies and Chiers, Koen and van Loon, Gunther},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 11th European College of Equine Internal Medicine congress},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  title        = {Friesian horses show higher arterial blood pressure compared to Warmbloods },
  year         = {2018},
}