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Prefrontal brain stimulation during food-related inhibition training : effects on food craving, food consumption and inhibitory control

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Abstract
Modulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity using non-invasive brain stimulation has been shown to reduce food craving as well as food consumption. Using a preregistered design, we examined whether bilateral transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the DLPFC could reduce food craving and consumption in healthy participants when administered alongside the cognitive target of inhibitory control training. Participants (N = 172) received either active or sham tDCS (2 mA; anode F4, cathode F3) while completing a food-related Go/No-Go task. State food craving, ad-lib food consumption and response inhibition were evaluated. Compared with sham stimulation, we found no evidence for an effect of active tDCS on any of these outcome measures in a predominantly female sample. Our findings raise doubts about the effectiveness of single-session tDCS on food craving and consumption. Consideration of individual differences, improvements in tDCS protocols and multi-session testing are discussed.
Keywords
transcranial direct current stimulation, brain stimulation, food intake, food craving, inhibitory control, HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, RESPONSE-INHIBITION, STIMULUS-SPECIFICITY, SELF-CONTROL, TDCS, MECHANISMS, BEHAVIOR, OBESITY, EXCITABILITY

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Citation

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MLA
Sedgmond, Jemma, et al. “Prefrontal Brain Stimulation during Food-Related Inhibition Training : Effects on Food Craving, Food Consumption and Inhibitory Control.” ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE, vol. 6, no. 1, 2019.
APA
Sedgmond, J., Lawrence, N. S., Verbruggen, F., Morrison, S., Chambers, C. D., & Adams, R. C. (2019). Prefrontal brain stimulation during food-related inhibition training : effects on food craving, food consumption and inhibitory control. ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE, 6(1).
Chicago author-date
Sedgmond, Jemma, Natalia S. Lawrence, Frederick Verbruggen, Sinead Morrison, Christopher D. Chambers, and Rachel C. Adams. 2019. “Prefrontal Brain Stimulation during Food-Related Inhibition Training : Effects on Food Craving, Food Consumption and Inhibitory Control.” ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE 6 (1).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Sedgmond, Jemma, Natalia S. Lawrence, Frederick Verbruggen, Sinead Morrison, Christopher D. Chambers, and Rachel C. Adams. 2019. “Prefrontal Brain Stimulation during Food-Related Inhibition Training : Effects on Food Craving, Food Consumption and Inhibitory Control.” ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE 6 (1).
Vancouver
1.
Sedgmond J, Lawrence NS, Verbruggen F, Morrison S, Chambers CD, Adams RC. Prefrontal brain stimulation during food-related inhibition training : effects on food craving, food consumption and inhibitory control. ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE. 2019;6(1).
IEEE
[1]
J. Sedgmond, N. S. Lawrence, F. Verbruggen, S. Morrison, C. D. Chambers, and R. C. Adams, “Prefrontal brain stimulation during food-related inhibition training : effects on food craving, food consumption and inhibitory control,” ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE, vol. 6, no. 1, 2019.
@article{8604137,
  abstract     = {Modulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity using non-invasive brain stimulation has been shown to reduce food craving as well as food consumption. Using a preregistered design, we examined whether bilateral transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the DLPFC could reduce food craving and consumption in healthy participants when administered alongside the cognitive target of inhibitory control training. Participants (N = 172) received either active or sham tDCS (2 mA; anode F4, cathode F3) while completing a food-related Go/No-Go task. State food craving, ad-lib food consumption and response inhibition were evaluated. Compared with sham stimulation, we found no evidence for an effect of active tDCS on any of these outcome measures in a predominantly female sample. Our findings raise doubts about the effectiveness of single-session tDCS on food craving and consumption. Consideration of individual differences, improvements in tDCS protocols and multi-session testing are discussed.},
  articleno    = {181186},
  author       = {Sedgmond, Jemma and Lawrence, Natalia S. and Verbruggen, Frederick and Morrison, Sinead and Chambers, Christopher D. and Adams, Rachel C.},
  issn         = {2054-5703},
  journal      = {ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE},
  keywords     = {transcranial direct current stimulation,brain stimulation,food intake,food craving,inhibitory control,HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX,INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES,RESPONSE-INHIBITION,STIMULUS-SPECIFICITY,SELF-CONTROL,TDCS,MECHANISMS,BEHAVIOR,OBESITY,EXCITABILITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {15},
  title        = {Prefrontal brain stimulation during food-related inhibition training : effects on food craving, food consumption and inhibitory control},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.181186},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2019},
}

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