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Associations between sedentary time, physical activity and bone health among older people using compositional data analysis

(2018) PLOS ONE. 13(10).
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Abstract
Introduction : Aging is associated with a progressive decrease in bone mass (BM), and being physical active is one of the main strategies to combat this continuous loss. Nonetheless, because daily time is limited, time spent on each movement behavior is co-dependent. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between BM and movement behaviors in elderly people using compositional data analysis. Methods : We analyzed 871 older people [395 men (76.9 +/- 5.3y) and 476 women (76.7 +/- 4.7y)]. Time spent in sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), was assessed using accelerometry. BM was determined by bone densitometry (DXA). The sample was divided according to sex and bone health indicators. Results : The combined effect of all movement behaviors (PA and SB) was significantly associated with whole body, leg and femoral region BM in the whole sample (p<0.05), with leg and pelvic BM (p<0.05) in men and, with whole body, arm and leg BM (p<0.05) in women. In men, arm and pelvic BM were negatively associated with SB and whole body, pelvic and leg BM were positively associated with MVPA (p<0.05). In women, whole body and leg BM were positively associated with SB. Arm and whole body BM were positively associated and leg BM was negatively associated with LPA and arm BM was negatively associated with MVPA (p<0.05). Women without bone fractures spent less time in SB and more in LPA and MVPA than the subgroup with bone fractures. Conclusion : We identified that the positive effect of MVPA relative to the other behaviors on bone mass is the strongest overall effect in men. Furthermore, women might decrease bone fracture risk through PA increase and SB reduction, despite the fact that no clear benefits of PA for bone mass were found.
Keywords
HIGH-IMPACT EXERCISE, MINERAL DENSITY, POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN, RISK-FACTORS, OSTEOPOROSIS, POPULATION, BEHAVIOR, FRACTURE, ADULTS, FRAILTY

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Chicago
Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene, Asier Mañas, José Losa-Reyna, Leocadio Rodríguez-Mañas, Sebastien Chastin, Luis Alegre, Francisco J García-García, and Ignacio Ara. 2018. “Associations Between Sedentary Time, Physical Activity and Bone Health Among Older People Using Compositional Data Analysis.” Plos One 13 (10).
APA
Rodríguez-Gómez, I., Mañas, A., Losa-Reyna, J., Rodríguez-Mañas, L., Chastin, S., Alegre, L., García-García, F. J., et al. (2018). Associations between sedentary time, physical activity and bone health among older people using compositional data analysis. PLOS ONE, 13(10).
Vancouver
1.
Rodríguez-Gómez I, Mañas A, Losa-Reyna J, Rodríguez-Mañas L, Chastin S, Alegre L, et al. Associations between sedentary time, physical activity and bone health among older people using compositional data analysis. PLOS ONE. 2018;13(10).
MLA
Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene et al. “Associations Between Sedentary Time, Physical Activity and Bone Health Among Older People Using Compositional Data Analysis.” PLOS ONE 13.10 (2018): n. pag. Print.
@article{8603952,
  abstract     = {Introduction : Aging is associated with a progressive decrease in bone mass (BM), and being physical active is one of the main strategies to combat this continuous loss. Nonetheless, because daily time is limited, time spent on each movement behavior is co-dependent. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between BM and movement behaviors in elderly people using compositional data analysis. 
Methods : We analyzed 871 older people [395 men (76.9 +/- 5.3y) and 476 women (76.7 +/- 4.7y)]. Time spent in sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), was assessed using accelerometry. BM was determined by bone densitometry (DXA). The sample was divided according to sex and bone health indicators. 
Results : The combined effect of all movement behaviors (PA and SB) was significantly associated with whole body, leg and femoral region BM in the whole sample (p{\textlangle}0.05), with leg and pelvic BM (p{\textlangle}0.05) in men and, with whole body, arm and leg BM (p{\textlangle}0.05) in women. In men, arm and pelvic BM were negatively associated with SB and whole body, pelvic and leg BM were positively associated with MVPA (p{\textlangle}0.05). In women, whole body and leg BM were positively associated with SB. Arm and whole body BM were positively associated and leg BM was negatively associated with LPA and arm BM was negatively associated with MVPA (p{\textlangle}0.05). Women without bone fractures spent less time in SB and more in LPA and MVPA than the subgroup with bone fractures. 
Conclusion : We identified that the positive effect of MVPA relative to the other behaviors on bone mass is the strongest overall effect in men. Furthermore, women might decrease bone fracture risk through PA increase and SB reduction, despite the fact that no clear benefits of PA for bone mass were found.},
  articleno    = {e0206013},
  author       = {Rodr{\'i}guez-G{\'o}mez, Irene and Ma{\~n}as, Asier and Losa-Reyna, Jos{\'e} and Rodr{\'i}guez-Ma{\~n}as, Leocadio and Chastin, Sebastien and Alegre, Luis and Garc{\'i}a-Garc{\'i}a, Francisco J and Ara, Ignacio},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {17},
  title        = {Associations between sedentary time, physical activity and bone health among older people using compositional data analysis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206013},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2018},
}

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