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Differential sexual network connectivity offers a parsimonious explanation for population-level variations in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis : a data-driven, model-supported hypothesis

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Abstract
Background: The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginal microbiota types varies dramatically between different populations around the world. Understanding what underpins these differences is important, as high-diversity microbiotas associated with BV are implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes and enhanced susceptibility to and transmission of sexually transmitted infections. Main text: We hypothesize that these variations in the vaginal microbiota can, in part, be explained by variations in the connectivity of sexual networks. We argue: 1) Couple-level data suggest that BV-associated bacteria can be sexually transmitted and hence high sexual network connectivity would be expected to promote the spread of BV-associated bacteria. Epidemiological studies have found positive associations between indicators of network connectivity and the prevalence of BV; 2) The relationship between BV prevalence and STI incidence/prevalence can be parsimoniously explained by differential network connectivity; 3) Studies from other mammals are generally supportive of the association between network connectivity and high-diversity vaginal microbiota. Conclusion: To test this hypothesis, we propose a combination of empirical and simulation-based study designs.
Keywords
SIMPLEX-VIRUS TYPE-2, TRICHOMONAS-VAGINALIS INFECTION, TRANSMITTED, INFECTIONS, CONCURRENT PARTNERSHIPS, GARDNERELLA-VAGINALIS, UNITED-STATES, RISK-FACTORS, LACTOBACILLUS-INERS, HIV PREVALENCE, GRAM, STAIN, Bacterial vaginosis, Microbiome, Sexual network connectivity, Concurrency, STI, HIV

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MLA
Kenyon, Chris R, Wim Delva, and Rebecca M Brotman. “Differential Sexual Network Connectivity Offers a Parsimonious Explanation for Population-level Variations in the Prevalence of Bacterial Vaginosis : a Data-driven, Model-supported Hypothesis.” BMC WOMENS HEALTH 19 (2019): n. pag. Print.
APA
Kenyon, C. R., Delva, W., & Brotman, R. M. (2019). Differential sexual network connectivity offers a parsimonious explanation for population-level variations in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis : a data-driven, model-supported hypothesis. BMC WOMENS HEALTH, 19.
Chicago author-date
Kenyon, Chris R, Wim Delva, and Rebecca M Brotman. 2019. “Differential Sexual Network Connectivity Offers a Parsimonious Explanation for Population-level Variations in the Prevalence of Bacterial Vaginosis : a Data-driven, Model-supported Hypothesis.” Bmc Womens Health 19.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Kenyon, Chris R, Wim Delva, and Rebecca M Brotman. 2019. “Differential Sexual Network Connectivity Offers a Parsimonious Explanation for Population-level Variations in the Prevalence of Bacterial Vaginosis : a Data-driven, Model-supported Hypothesis.” Bmc Womens Health 19.
Vancouver
1.
Kenyon CR, Delva W, Brotman RM. Differential sexual network connectivity offers a parsimonious explanation for population-level variations in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis : a data-driven, model-supported hypothesis. BMC WOMENS HEALTH. 2019;19.
IEEE
[1]
C. R. Kenyon, W. Delva, and R. M. Brotman, “Differential sexual network connectivity offers a parsimonious explanation for population-level variations in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis : a data-driven, model-supported hypothesis,” BMC WOMENS HEALTH, vol. 19, 2019.
@article{8603435,
  abstract     = {Background: The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginal microbiota types varies dramatically between different populations around the world. Understanding what underpins these differences is important, as high-diversity microbiotas associated with BV are implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes and enhanced susceptibility to and transmission of sexually transmitted infections.
Main text: We hypothesize that these variations in the vaginal microbiota can, in part, be explained by variations in the connectivity of sexual networks. We argue: 1) Couple-level data suggest that BV-associated bacteria can be sexually transmitted and hence high sexual network connectivity would be expected to promote the spread of BV-associated bacteria. Epidemiological studies have found positive associations between indicators of network connectivity and the prevalence of BV; 2) The relationship between BV prevalence and STI incidence/prevalence can be parsimoniously explained by differential network connectivity; 3) Studies from other mammals are generally supportive of the association between network connectivity and high-diversity vaginal microbiota.
Conclusion: To test this hypothesis, we propose a combination of empirical and simulation-based study designs.},
  articleno    = {8},
  author       = {Kenyon, Chris R and Delva, Wim and Brotman, Rebecca M},
  issn         = {1472-6874},
  journal      = {BMC WOMENS HEALTH},
  keywords     = {SIMPLEX-VIRUS TYPE-2,TRICHOMONAS-VAGINALIS INFECTION,TRANSMITTED,INFECTIONS,CONCURRENT PARTNERSHIPS,GARDNERELLA-VAGINALIS,UNITED-STATES,RISK-FACTORS,LACTOBACILLUS-INERS,HIV PREVALENCE,GRAM,STAIN,Bacterial vaginosis,Microbiome,Sexual network connectivity,Concurrency,STI,HIV},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {9},
  title        = {Differential sexual network connectivity offers a parsimonious explanation for population-level variations in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis : a data-driven, model-supported hypothesis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12905-018-0703-0},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2019},
}

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