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Abstract
Concerns about poaching and trafficking have led conservationists to seek urgent responses to tackle the impact on wildlife. One possible solution is the militarisation of conservation, which holds potentially far-reaching consequences. It is important to engage critically with the militarisation of conservation, including identifying and reflecting on the problems it produces for wildlife, for people living with wildlife and for those tasked with implementing militarised strategies. This Perspectives piece is a first step towards synthesising the main themes in emerging critiques of militarised conservation. We identify five major themes: first, the importance of understanding how poaching is defined; second, understanding the ways that local communities experience militarised conservation; third, the experiences of rangers; fourth, how the militarisation of conservation can contribute to violence where conservation operates in the context of armed conflict; and finally how it fits in with and reflects wider political economic dynamics. Ultimately, we suggest that failure to engage more critically with militarisation risks making things worse for the people involved and lead to poor conservation outcomes in the long run.
Keywords
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Nature and Landscape Conservation, Anti-poaching, Human-wildlife conflict, Militarisation, Poaching, Political economy, Protected areas, Rangers, Trafficking, Violence, Wildlife trade, KRUGER-NATIONAL-PARK, GREEN MILITARIZATION, WILDLIFE CRIME, SOCIAL-SCIENCE, WAR, SECURITY, VIOLENCE, BIODIVERSITY, ACCUMULATION, GEOGRAPHIES

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Duffy, Rosaleen et al. “Why We Must Question the Militarisation of Conservation.” BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION 232 (2019): 66–73. Print.
APA
Duffy, R., Massé, F., Smidt, E., Marijnen, E., Büscher, B., Verweijen, J., Ramutsindela, M., et al. (2019). Why we must question the militarisation of conservation. BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, 232, 66–73.
Chicago author-date
Duffy, Rosaleen, Francis Massé, Emile Smidt, Esther Marijnen, Bram Büscher, Judith Verweijen, Maano Ramutsindela, Trishant Simlai, Laure Joanny, and Elizabeth Lunstrum. 2019. “Why We Must Question the Militarisation of Conservation.” Biological Conservation 232: 66–73.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Duffy, Rosaleen, Francis Massé, Emile Smidt, Esther Marijnen, Bram Büscher, Judith Verweijen, Maano Ramutsindela, Trishant Simlai, Laure Joanny, and Elizabeth Lunstrum. 2019. “Why We Must Question the Militarisation of Conservation.” Biological Conservation 232: 66–73.
Vancouver
1.
Duffy R, Massé F, Smidt E, Marijnen E, Büscher B, Verweijen J, et al. Why we must question the militarisation of conservation. BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION. Elsevier ; 2019;232:66–73.
IEEE
[1]
R. Duffy et al., “Why we must question the militarisation of conservation,” BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, vol. 232, pp. 66–73, 2019.
@article{8601307,
  abstract     = {Concerns about poaching and trafficking have led conservationists to seek urgent responses to tackle the impact on wildlife. One possible solution is the militarisation of conservation, which holds potentially far-reaching consequences. It is important to engage critically with the militarisation of conservation, including identifying and reflecting on the problems it produces for wildlife, for people living with wildlife and for those tasked with implementing militarised strategies. This Perspectives piece is a first step towards synthesising the main themes in emerging critiques of militarised conservation. We identify five major themes: first, the importance of understanding how poaching is defined; second, understanding the ways that local communities experience militarised conservation; third, the experiences of rangers; fourth, how the militarisation of conservation can contribute to violence where conservation operates in the context of armed conflict; and finally how it fits in with and reflects wider political economic dynamics. Ultimately, we suggest that failure to engage more critically with militarisation risks making things worse for the people involved and lead to poor conservation outcomes in the long run.},
  author       = {Duffy, Rosaleen and Massé, Francis and Smidt, Emile and Marijnen, Esther and Büscher, Bram and Verweijen, Judith and Ramutsindela, Maano and Simlai, Trishant and Joanny, Laure and Lunstrum, Elizabeth},
  issn         = {0006-3207},
  journal      = {BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION},
  keywords     = {Ecology,Evolution,Behavior and Systematics,Nature and Landscape Conservation,Anti-poaching,Human-wildlife conflict,Militarisation,Poaching,Political economy,Protected areas,Rangers,Trafficking,Violence,Wildlife trade,KRUGER-NATIONAL-PARK,GREEN MILITARIZATION,WILDLIFE CRIME,SOCIAL-SCIENCE,WAR,SECURITY,VIOLENCE,BIODIVERSITY,ACCUMULATION,GEOGRAPHIES},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {66--73},
  publisher    = {Elsevier },
  title        = {Why we must question the militarisation of conservation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2019.01.013},
  volume       = {232},
  year         = {2019},
}

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