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Perceptions of physicians, medical and nursing students concerning shared decision-making: a cross-sectional study

(2019)
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Abstract
Background: shared decision making (SDM) is promoted as a facilitator for a patient-centered health care. However, the attitudes of care providers pertaining SDM in various countries such as Belgium remain unknown. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted between June and September 2017 in which sharing attitudes of Flemish physicians, third year postgraduate medical, and postgraduate nursing students were measured with the Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale. Higher scores on the six-point scale indicate a patient-centered respondent. In addition, sex, age, rank, occupation and specialty were surveyed to compare sharing attitudes between the groups. Independent t-tests, One and Two-way ANOVA and multivariable regression with the variables sex, age, occupation and specialty were calculated. Results: a total of 266 responses, of which 93 physicians, 147 medical and 26 nursing students were analyzed. Mean scores from the groups were 4,24 ± 0,64; 4,30 ± 0,61; and 4,30 ± 0,67, respectively. In the multivariable model, female sex (p<0,10) and employment (p<0,05) in general practice or internal medicine is predictive for higher sharing among physicians. In addition, univariate differences (p<0,05) between specialisms have been found in which pediatricians (4,79 ± 0,69), psychiatrists (4,74 ± 0,47), GPs (4,31 ± 0,59) and Obs/Gyn (4,40 ± 0,38) score higher than surgeons (3,84 ± 0,58). Discussion: Flemish caregivers’ and trainees’ perceptions were disease-orientated. Despite the small samples and possibility for social desirability bias, it is likely that the scores of physicians change owing to prolonged contact to the specific clinical context. Additionally, academic trained nurses share the belief that the physician should decide and the patient should rely on his knowledge rather than his own. Conclusion: this is the first study that examined these attitudes from providers and trainees in Flanders. There is an urgent need for health policy and educational institutions to facilitate an environment in which SDM is supported.

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Cantaert, Gabriël, Kim Smolderen, and Ann Van Hecke. 2019. “Perceptions of Physicians, Medical and Nursing Students Concerning Shared Decision-making: a Cross-sectional Study.” In .
APA
Cantaert, G., Smolderen, K., & Van Hecke, A. (2019). Perceptions of physicians, medical and nursing students concerning shared decision-making: a cross-sectional study. Presented at the CARE4 International Scientific Nursing and Midwifery Congress, Third Edition.
Vancouver
1.
Cantaert G, Smolderen K, Van Hecke A. Perceptions of physicians, medical and nursing students concerning shared decision-making: a cross-sectional study. 2019.
MLA
Cantaert, Gabriël, Kim Smolderen, and Ann Van Hecke. “Perceptions of Physicians, Medical and Nursing Students Concerning Shared Decision-making: a Cross-sectional Study.” 2019. Print.
@inproceedings{8599737,
  abstract     = {Background: shared decision making (SDM) is promoted as a facilitator for a patient-centered health care. However, the attitudes of care providers pertaining SDM in various countries such as Belgium remain unknown.
Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted between June and September 2017 in which sharing attitudes of Flemish physicians, third year postgraduate medical, and postgraduate nursing students were measured with the Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale. Higher scores on the six-point scale indicate a patient-centered respondent. In addition, sex, age, rank, occupation and specialty were surveyed to compare sharing attitudes between the groups. Independent t-tests, One and Two-way ANOVA and multivariable regression with the variables sex, age, occupation and specialty were calculated.
Results: a total of 266 responses, of which 93 physicians, 147 medical and 26 nursing students were analyzed. Mean scores from the groups were 4,24 {\textpm} 0,64; 4,30 {\textpm} 0,61; and 4,30 {\textpm} 0,67, respectively. In the multivariable model, female sex (p{\textlangle}0,10) and employment (p{\textlangle}0,05) in general practice or internal medicine is predictive for higher sharing among physicians. In addition, univariate differences (p{\textlangle}0,05) between specialisms have been found in which pediatricians (4,79 {\textpm} 0,69), psychiatrists (4,74 {\textpm} 0,47), GPs (4,31 {\textpm} 0,59) and Obs/Gyn (4,40 {\textpm} 0,38) score higher than surgeons (3,84 {\textpm} 0,58).
Discussion: Flemish caregivers{\textquoteright} and trainees{\textquoteright} perceptions were disease-orientated. Despite the small samples and possibility for social desirability bias, it is likely that the scores of physicians change owing to prolonged contact to the specific clinical context. Additionally, academic trained nurses share the belief that the physician should decide and the patient should rely on his knowledge rather than his own.
Conclusion: this is the first study that examined these attitudes from providers and trainees in Flanders. There is an urgent need for health policy and educational institutions to facilitate an environment in which SDM is supported.},
  author       = {Cantaert, Gabri{\"e}l and Smolderen, Kim and Van Hecke, Ann},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Leuven},
  title        = {Perceptions of physicians, medical and nursing students concerning shared decision-making: a cross-sectional study},
  year         = {2019},
}