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Thermoplastic polyacetals : chemistry from the past for a sustainable future?

Andrea Hufendiek (UGent) , Sophie Lingier (UGent) and Filip Du Prez (UGent)
(2019) POLYMER CHEMISTRY. 10(1). p.9-33
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Abstract
Synthetic thermoplastic polyacetals have a long history dating back to 1912. While polymers with non-cyclic acetal repeat units are typically well soluble and degrade easily at biologically relevant pH values, polycycloacetals have a rigid polymer backbone, resulting in favorable thermal and mechanical properties but are often insoluble and thus challenging to process. In recent years, the degradation behavior and the availability of many building blocks from renewable resources have sparked renewed interest in poly(cyclo)acetals. This review provides a critical overview over the synthetic routes to polyacetals, highlighting where possible the material properties. Direct polyacetalization and polytransacetalization techniques are discussed first, followed by the polymerization of acetal containing monomers and recent ring opening polymerization approaches. Thermoplastic polyacetals show promise in delivery applications but also as bulk materials, where a combination of excellent material properties, a potential for renewable sourcing and degradation as an end-of-life option are of ever increasing importance.
Keywords
RING-OPENING POLYMERIZATION, SOLID-STATE MODIFICATION, DRUG-DELIVERY, HYPERBRANCHED POLYACETALS, POLYKETAL MICROPARTICLES, CATIONIC-POLYMERIZATION, ALIPHATIC POLYESTERS, AROMATIC POLYAMIDES, COPOLYMER MICELLES, ACID

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Hufendiek, Andrea, Sophie Lingier, and Filip Du Prez. 2019. “Thermoplastic Polyacetals : Chemistry from the Past for a Sustainable Future?” Polymer Chemistry 10 (1): 9–33.
APA
Hufendiek, A., Lingier, S., & Du Prez, F. (2019). Thermoplastic polyacetals : chemistry from the past for a sustainable future? POLYMER CHEMISTRY, 10(1), 9–33.
Vancouver
1.
Hufendiek A, Lingier S, Du Prez F. Thermoplastic polyacetals : chemistry from the past for a sustainable future? POLYMER CHEMISTRY. 2019;10(1):9–33.
MLA
Hufendiek, Andrea, Sophie Lingier, and Filip Du Prez. “Thermoplastic Polyacetals : Chemistry from the Past for a Sustainable Future?” POLYMER CHEMISTRY 10.1 (2019): 9–33. Print.
@article{8599653,
  abstract     = {Synthetic thermoplastic polyacetals have a long history dating back to 1912. While polymers with non-cyclic acetal repeat units are typically well soluble and degrade easily at biologically relevant pH values, polycycloacetals have a rigid polymer backbone, resulting in favorable thermal and mechanical properties but are often insoluble and thus challenging to process. In recent years, the degradation behavior and the availability of many building blocks from renewable resources have sparked renewed interest in poly(cyclo)acetals. This review provides a critical overview over the synthetic routes to polyacetals, highlighting where possible the material properties. Direct polyacetalization and polytransacetalization techniques are discussed first, followed by the polymerization of acetal containing monomers and recent ring opening polymerization approaches. Thermoplastic polyacetals show promise in delivery applications but also as bulk materials, where a combination of excellent material properties, a potential for renewable sourcing and degradation as an end-of-life option are of ever increasing importance.},
  author       = {Hufendiek, Andrea and Lingier, Sophie and Du Prez, Filip},
  issn         = {1759-9954},
  journal      = {POLYMER CHEMISTRY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {9--33},
  title        = {Thermoplastic polyacetals : chemistry from the past for a sustainable future?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8py01219a},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2019},
}

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