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Where is leadership in nursing and midwifery: activities and associated competencies of advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners

Régine Goemaes (UGent) , Elsie Decoene (UGent) , Dimitri Beeckman (UGent) , Sofie Verhaeghe (UGent) and Ann Van Hecke (UGent)
(2019)
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Abstract
Background: Advanced practice nursing and advanced midwifery practice roles are increasingly implemented internationally. Research examining advanced practice nurses’ and advanced midwife practitioners’ task performance, competency levels, and factors associated with task non-execution integrated in one study is lacking. Research regarding leadership activities of advanced practitioners is also scarce, despite leadership being an important part of these roles. This study examined these. Methods: A survey was undertaken among advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners in hospitals in Belgium. Tasks were categorized in seven domains: clinical expertise/expert guidance/coaching, consultation/consultancy, research, change management/innovation, multidisciplinary cooperation/care coordination, ethical decision-making, and clinical/professional leadership. Task performance and competency level frequencies were calculated. Regression analysis identified factors associated with task non-execution. Results: Advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners (n=63) executed tasks in all domains. Task non-execution was associated with work setting, years of work experience, position appointment percentage, perceived competency level, financing source, and type of hierarchical supervisor. Regarding leadership activities, participants mainly focused on guideline and care protocol development within the hospital, maintaining contacts with colleagues in other healthcare organizations and participating in policy development meetings regarding domain-specific topics. A minority of advanced practitioners participated in hospital policy meetings and (inter)national advisory boards, or maintained contacts with international professional and patient associations. Non-execution of several leadership activities was associated with advanced practitioners feeling incompetent. Discussion and conclusion: As feeling incompetent was associated with task non-execution, optimization of advanced practice nurses’ and advanced midwife practitioners’ training, especially regarding leadership activities, should be considered. Leadership competencies are essential for the advancement and further professionalization of nursing and midwifery on a national and international level. Only a limited number of variables possibly associated with task non-execution were collected in this study. Therefore, more profound research into barriers hindering advanced practitioners in reaching their full potential is recommended.

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Chicago
Goemaes, Régine, Elsie Decoene, Dimitri Beeckman, Sofie Verhaeghe, and Ann Van Hecke. 2019. “Where Is Leadership in Nursing and Midwifery: Activities and Associated Competencies of Advanced Practice Nurses and Advanced Midwife Practitioners.” In .
APA
Goemaes, R., Decoene, E., Beeckman, D., Verhaeghe, S., & Van Hecke, A. (2019). Where is leadership in nursing and midwifery: activities and associated competencies of advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners. Presented at the CARE4 International Scientific Nursing and Midwifery Congress, Third Edition.
Vancouver
1.
Goemaes R, Decoene E, Beeckman D, Verhaeghe S, Van Hecke A. Where is leadership in nursing and midwifery: activities and associated competencies of advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners. 2019.
MLA
Goemaes, Régine et al. “Where Is Leadership in Nursing and Midwifery: Activities and Associated Competencies of Advanced Practice Nurses and Advanced Midwife Practitioners.” 2019. Print.
@inproceedings{8599646,
  abstract     = {Background: Advanced practice nursing and advanced midwifery practice roles are increasingly implemented internationally. Research examining advanced practice nurses{\textquoteright} and advanced midwife practitioners{\textquoteright} task performance, competency levels, and factors associated with task non-execution integrated in one study is lacking. Research regarding leadership activities of advanced practitioners is also scarce, despite leadership being an important part of these roles. This study examined these.
Methods: A survey was undertaken among advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners in hospitals in Belgium. Tasks were categorized in seven domains: clinical expertise/expert guidance/coaching, consultation/consultancy, research, change management/innovation, multidisciplinary cooperation/care coordination, ethical decision-making, and clinical/professional leadership. Task performance and competency level frequencies were calculated. Regression analysis identified factors associated with task non-execution.
Results: Advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners (n=63) executed tasks in all domains. Task non-execution was associated with work setting, years of work experience, position appointment percentage, perceived competency level, financing source, and type of hierarchical supervisor. Regarding leadership activities, participants mainly focused on guideline and care protocol development within the hospital, maintaining contacts with colleagues in other healthcare organizations and participating in policy development meetings regarding domain-specific topics. A minority of advanced practitioners participated in hospital policy meetings and (inter)national advisory boards, or maintained contacts with international professional and patient associations. Non-execution of several leadership activities was associated with advanced practitioners feeling incompetent.
Discussion and conclusion: As feeling incompetent was associated with task non-execution, optimization of advanced practice nurses{\textquoteright} and advanced midwife practitioners{\textquoteright} training, especially regarding leadership activities, should be considered. Leadership competencies are essential for the advancement and further professionalization of nursing and midwifery on a national and international level. Only a limited number of variables possibly associated with task non-execution were collected in this study. Therefore, more profound research into barriers hindering advanced practitioners in reaching their full potential is recommended.},
  author       = {Goemaes, R{\'e}gine and Decoene, Elsie and Beeckman, Dimitri and Verhaeghe, Sofie and Van Hecke, Ann},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Leuven},
  title        = {Where is leadership in nursing and midwifery: activities and associated competencies of advanced practice nurses and advanced midwife practitioners},
  year         = {2019},
}