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Drinking water bacterial communities exhibit specific and selective necrotrophic growth

Ioanna Chatzigiannidou (UGent) , Ruben Props (UGent) and Nico Boon (UGent)
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Abstract
Physicochemical water disinfection methods result in the reduction of bacterial concentrations by orders of magnitude, but not in the total elimination of the bacterial community. As such, the dead bacterial biomass may act as a carbon and nutrient source for the survivor populations. The ability of bacterial strains to grow on dead bacterial cells has been described before as necrotrophy. We investigated the impact of killed bacterial biomass of two different bacterial strains on the growth potential of natural drinking water microbial communities. Many indigenous bacterial taxa could grow on dead biomass, with the total bacterial concentration increasing from 10(4) to 10(8) cells/ml. Necrotrophic growth was specific (43 enriched taxa) and selective (i.e. enriched taxa were dependent on the type of dead biomass). The potential of natural water communities to grow necrotrophically has remained underexplored. Nevertheless the phenomenon can have a big impact in water quality and deserves more attention.
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DIVERSITY

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Chatzigiannidou, Ioanna, Ruben Props, and Nico Boon. “Drinking Water Bacterial Communities Exhibit Specific and Selective Necrotrophic Growth.” NPJ CLEAN WATER 1 (2018): n. pag. Print.
APA
Chatzigiannidou, I., Props, R., & Boon, N. (2018). Drinking water bacterial communities exhibit specific and selective necrotrophic growth. NPJ CLEAN WATER, 1.
Chicago author-date
Chatzigiannidou, Ioanna, Ruben Props, and Nico Boon. 2018. “Drinking Water Bacterial Communities Exhibit Specific and Selective Necrotrophic Growth.” Npj Clean Water 1.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Chatzigiannidou, Ioanna, Ruben Props, and Nico Boon. 2018. “Drinking Water Bacterial Communities Exhibit Specific and Selective Necrotrophic Growth.” Npj Clean Water 1.
Vancouver
1.
Chatzigiannidou I, Props R, Boon N. Drinking water bacterial communities exhibit specific and selective necrotrophic growth. NPJ CLEAN WATER. 2018;1.
IEEE
[1]
I. Chatzigiannidou, R. Props, and N. Boon, “Drinking water bacterial communities exhibit specific and selective necrotrophic growth,” NPJ CLEAN WATER, vol. 1, 2018.
@article{8599216,
  abstract     = {Physicochemical water disinfection methods result in the reduction of bacterial concentrations by orders of magnitude, but not in the total elimination of the bacterial community. As such, the dead bacterial biomass may act as a carbon and nutrient source for the survivor populations. The ability of bacterial strains to grow on dead bacterial cells has been described before as necrotrophy. We investigated the impact of killed bacterial biomass of two different bacterial strains on the growth potential of natural drinking water microbial communities. Many indigenous bacterial taxa could grow on dead biomass, with the total bacterial concentration increasing from 10(4) to 10(8) cells/ml. Necrotrophic growth was specific (43 enriched taxa) and selective (i.e. enriched taxa were dependent on the type of dead biomass). The potential of natural water communities to grow necrotrophically has remained underexplored. Nevertheless the phenomenon can have a big impact in water quality and deserves more attention.},
  articleno    = {22},
  author       = {Chatzigiannidou, Ioanna and Props, Ruben and Boon, Nico},
  issn         = {2059-7037},
  journal      = {NPJ CLEAN WATER},
  keywords     = {DIVERSITY},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {4},
  title        = {Drinking water bacterial communities exhibit specific and selective necrotrophic growth},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41545-018-0023-9},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2018},
}

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