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Loss of nuclear envelope integrity in aging and disease

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Abstract
The nuclear envelope (NE) serves as a central organizing unit for the eukaryotic cell. By virtue of its highly selective, semipermeable barrier function, the NE shields the enclosed genetic material, while at the same time ensuring its regulated transcription, replication, and repair. The NE has long been considered to only dismantle during mitosis. However, in recent years it has become clear that in a variety of pathologies, NE integrity becomes compromised during interphase as well. Loss of NE integrity, or briefly NE stress, is manifested in various ways, ranging from a gradual reduction in nucleocytoplasmic transport function, to selective loss and degradation of NE components, and finally to catastrophic rupture events that provoke abhorrent molecular fluxes between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Although cells manage to cope with such forms of NE stress, the different insults to nuclear compartmentalization alter gene regulation and jeopardize genome stability. Hence, loss of NE integrity is emerging as a broad-spectrum pathogenic mechanism. In this review, we discuss the relevance of nuclear compartmentalization and the loss thereof in aging and disease development.
Keywords
PLASMA-MEMBRANE REPAIR, GILFORD-PROGERIA-SYNDROME, A-TYPE LAMINS, PORE, COMPLEXES, DNA-DAMAGE, CELL-DEATH, OXIDATIVE STRESS, PROTEIN IMPORT, RAN, GRADIENT, CANCER-CELLS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Robijns, Joke et al. “Loss of Nuclear Envelope Integrity in Aging and Disease.” International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 336 336 (2018): 205–222. Print.
APA
Robijns, J., Houthaeve, G., Braeckmans, K., & De Vos, W. (2018). Loss of nuclear envelope integrity in aging and disease. International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 336, 336, 205–222.
Chicago author-date
Robijns, Joke, Gaëlle Houthaeve, Kevin Braeckmans, and Winnok De Vos. 2018. “Loss of Nuclear Envelope Integrity in Aging and Disease.” International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol. 336 336: 205–222.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Robijns, Joke, Gaëlle Houthaeve, Kevin Braeckmans, and Winnok De Vos. 2018. “Loss of Nuclear Envelope Integrity in Aging and Disease.” International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol. 336 336: 205–222.
Vancouver
1.
Robijns J, Houthaeve G, Braeckmans K, De Vos W. Loss of nuclear envelope integrity in aging and disease. International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 336. San Diego, CA, USA: Elsevier Academic Press; 2018;336:205–22.
IEEE
[1]
J. Robijns, G. Houthaeve, K. Braeckmans, and W. De Vos, “Loss of nuclear envelope integrity in aging and disease,” International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 336, vol. 336, pp. 205–222, 2018.
@article{8598964,
  abstract     = {The nuclear envelope (NE) serves as a central organizing unit for the eukaryotic cell. By virtue of its highly selective, semipermeable barrier function, the NE shields the enclosed genetic material, while at the same time ensuring its regulated transcription, replication, and repair. The NE has long been considered to only dismantle during mitosis. However, in recent years it has become clear that in a variety of pathologies, NE integrity becomes compromised during interphase as well. Loss of NE integrity, or briefly NE stress, is manifested in various ways, ranging from a gradual reduction in nucleocytoplasmic transport function, to selective loss and degradation of NE components, and finally to catastrophic rupture events that provoke abhorrent molecular fluxes between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Although cells manage to cope with such forms of NE stress, the different insults to nuclear compartmentalization alter gene regulation and jeopardize genome stability. Hence, loss of NE integrity is emerging as a broad-spectrum pathogenic mechanism. In this review, we discuss the relevance of nuclear compartmentalization and the loss thereof in aging and disease development.},
  author       = {Robijns, Joke and Houthaeve, Gaëlle and Braeckmans, Kevin and De Vos, Winnok},
  isbn         = {9780128146514},
  issn         = {1937-6448},
  journal      = {International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 336},
  keywords     = {PLASMA-MEMBRANE REPAIR,GILFORD-PROGERIA-SYNDROME,A-TYPE LAMINS,PORE,COMPLEXES,DNA-DAMAGE,CELL-DEATH,OXIDATIVE STRESS,PROTEIN IMPORT,RAN,GRADIENT,CANCER-CELLS},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {205--222},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Academic Press},
  title        = {Loss of nuclear envelope integrity in aging and disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.ircmb.2017.07.013},
  volume       = {336},
  year         = {2018},
}

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