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Secondary treated domestic wastewater in reverse electrodialysis : what is the best pre-treatment?

Marjolein Vanoppen (UGent) , Tom Van Vooren (UGent) , Leonardo Gutierrez (UGent) , M Roman, LJ-P Croué, Kim Verbeken (UGent) , Jo Philips (UGent) and Arne Verliefde (UGent)
Author
Organization
Project
REvivED water (Low energy solution for drinking water production by a REvival of ElectroDialysis systems)
Abstract
Although Reverse Electrodialysis (RED) is most commonly known as a selective separation technology used for the production of sustainable energy, it can also serve as a valuable pre-desalination tool. By coupling RED to Reverse Osmosis (RO) for seawater desalination: (1) sustainable energy is produced in the RED process and (2) seawater is partially desalinated prior to RO thus, decreasing the energy demand. In this study, secondary-treated wastewater is proposed as the low salinity source in RED and suitable pre-treatment techniques for this effluent are investigated. Although it is generally accepted that RED is less prone to fouling than typical pressure driven membrane processes, results showed that pre-treatment is a key to ensure efficient operation of the wastewater-seawater RED. Both 100 mu m filtration and rapid sand filtration proved to be suitable, with an increase in pressure drop of only 0.09-0.18 bar and a permselectivity decrease of only approximately 20% during 40 days of continuous operation. Conversely, River bank filtration did not perform better than the non-pretreated sample. As such, 100 mu m filtration and rapid sand filtration are considered suitable, robust, and cost efficient pre-treatment options for wastewater fed RED, enabling the improvement of the hybrid process of RED-RO seawater desalination.
Keywords
Reverse electrodialysis, wastewater, pre-treatment, desalination, DISSOLVED ORGANIC-CARBON, PRESSURE-RETARDED OSMOSIS, OF-THE-ART, POWER-DENSITY, SALINITY GRADIENTS, NANOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MICROPOLLUTANT REMOVAL, SEAWATER DESALINATION, MEMBRANES, MATTER

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vanoppen, Marjolein, Tom Van Vooren, Leonardo Gutierrez, M Roman, LJ-P Croué, Kim Verbeken, Jo Philips, and Arne Verliefde. 2019. “Secondary Treated Domestic Wastewater in Reverse Electrodialysis : What Is the Best Pre-treatment?” Separation and Purification Technology 218: 25–42.
APA
Vanoppen, M., Van Vooren, T., Gutierrez, L., Roman, M., Croué, L.-P., Verbeken, K., Philips, J., et al. (2019). Secondary treated domestic wastewater in reverse electrodialysis : what is the best pre-treatment? SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION TECHNOLOGY, 218, 25–42.
Vancouver
1.
Vanoppen M, Van Vooren T, Gutierrez L, Roman M, Croué L-P, Verbeken K, et al. Secondary treated domestic wastewater in reverse electrodialysis : what is the best pre-treatment? SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION TECHNOLOGY. 2019;218:25–42.
MLA
Vanoppen, Marjolein et al. “Secondary Treated Domestic Wastewater in Reverse Electrodialysis : What Is the Best Pre-treatment?” SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION TECHNOLOGY 218 (2019): 25–42. Print.
@article{8593914,
  abstract     = {Although Reverse Electrodialysis (RED) is most commonly known as a selective separation technology used for the production of sustainable energy, it can also serve as a valuable pre-desalination tool. By coupling RED to Reverse Osmosis (RO) for seawater desalination: (1) sustainable energy is produced in the RED process and (2) seawater is partially desalinated prior to RO thus, decreasing the energy demand. In this study, secondary-treated wastewater is proposed as the low salinity source in RED and suitable pre-treatment techniques for this effluent are investigated. Although it is generally accepted that RED is less prone to fouling than typical pressure driven membrane processes, results showed that pre-treatment is a key to ensure efficient operation of the wastewater-seawater RED. Both 100 mu m filtration and rapid sand filtration proved to be suitable, with an increase in pressure drop of only 0.09-0.18 bar and a permselectivity decrease of only approximately 20% during 40 days of continuous operation. Conversely, River bank filtration did not perform better than the non-pretreated sample. As such, 100 mu m filtration and rapid sand filtration are considered suitable, robust, and cost efficient pre-treatment options for wastewater fed RED, enabling the improvement of the hybrid process of RED-RO seawater desalination.},
  author       = {Vanoppen, Marjolein and Van Vooren, Tom and Gutierrez, Leonardo and Roman, M and Croué, LJ-P and Verbeken, Kim and Philips, Jo and Verliefde, Arne},
  issn         = {1383-5866},
  journal      = {SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION TECHNOLOGY},
  keywords     = {Reverse electrodialysis,wastewater,pre-treatment,desalination,DISSOLVED ORGANIC-CARBON,PRESSURE-RETARDED OSMOSIS,OF-THE-ART,POWER-DENSITY,SALINITY GRADIENTS,NANOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES,MICROPOLLUTANT REMOVAL,SEAWATER DESALINATION,MEMBRANES,MATTER},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {25--42},
  title        = {Secondary treated domestic wastewater in reverse electrodialysis : what is the best pre-treatment?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seppur.2018.12.057},
  volume       = {218},
  year         = {2019},
}

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