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Imagining Ukraine : from history and myths to Maidan protests

Vjosa Musliu (UGent) and Olga Burlyuk (UGent)
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Abstract
This article examines how the Maidan protests of 2013–2014 were a space for the collision of conflicting narratives on what Ukraine is and what it should be, and how past, present, and future were used to imagine contemporary Ukraine. Making use of speech acts by local and international actors and politicians on the Ukraine crisis, historical narratives on Ukraine, Maidan protest slogans, and field work data gathered throughout 2013–2016 in Ukraine, we identify four meta-narratives that enable us to unravel such an imagining: (1) Ukraine as a liminal category between East and West; (2) Ukraine as Russia, Ukraine as non-Russia; (3) Ukraine as Europe, Ukraine as non-Europe; and (4) Ukraine as Ukraine. We trace and contextualize these narratives in four separate sections. Positing all narratives in a discursive battleground and problematizing them as a struggle between stories, the article demonstrates that the imagining of contemporary Ukraine is deeply conditioned by the conflict between all four narratives. Ukraine is simultaneously all and none of them.
Keywords
Ukraine, identity, narratives, Maidan protests, Euromaidan

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Musliu, Vjosa, and Olga Burlyuk. “Imagining Ukraine : from History and Myths to Maidan Protests.” EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS AND SOCIETIES 33.3 (2019): 631–655. Print.
APA
Musliu, V., & Burlyuk, O. (2019). Imagining Ukraine : from history and myths to Maidan protests. EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS AND SOCIETIES, 33(3), 631–655.
Chicago author-date
Musliu, Vjosa, and Olga Burlyuk. 2019. “Imagining Ukraine : from History and Myths to Maidan Protests.” East European Politics and Societies 33 (3): 631–655.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Musliu, Vjosa, and Olga Burlyuk. 2019. “Imagining Ukraine : from History and Myths to Maidan Protests.” East European Politics and Societies 33 (3): 631–655.
Vancouver
1.
Musliu V, Burlyuk O. Imagining Ukraine : from history and myths to Maidan protests. EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS AND SOCIETIES. SAGE Publications; 2019;33(3):631–55.
IEEE
[1]
V. Musliu and O. Burlyuk, “Imagining Ukraine : from history and myths to Maidan protests,” EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS AND SOCIETIES, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 631–655, 2019.
@article{8593882,
  abstract     = {This article examines how the Maidan protests of 2013–2014 were a space for the collision of conflicting narratives on what Ukraine is and what it should be, and how past, present, and future were used to imagine contemporary Ukraine. Making use of speech acts by local and international actors and politicians on the Ukraine crisis, historical narratives on Ukraine, Maidan protest slogans, and field work data gathered throughout 2013–2016 in Ukraine, we identify four meta-narratives that enable us to unravel such an imagining: (1) Ukraine as a liminal category between East and West; (2) Ukraine as Russia, Ukraine as non-Russia; (3) Ukraine as Europe, Ukraine as non-Europe; and (4) Ukraine as Ukraine. We trace and contextualize these narratives in four separate sections. Positing all narratives in a discursive battleground and problematizing them as a struggle between stories, the article demonstrates that the imagining of contemporary Ukraine is deeply conditioned by the conflict between all four narratives. Ukraine is simultaneously all and none of them.},
  articleno    = {0888325418821410},
  author       = {Musliu, Vjosa and Burlyuk, Olga},
  issn         = {0888-3254},
  journal      = {EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS AND SOCIETIES},
  keywords     = {Ukraine,identity,narratives,Maidan protests,Euromaidan},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {0888325418821410:631--0888325418821410:655},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  title        = {Imagining Ukraine : from history and myths to Maidan protests},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0888325418821410},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2019},
}

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