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Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus straw can replace peat in strawberry cultivation, with beneficial effects on disease control

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Abstract
Peat based growing media are not ecologically sustainable and often fail to support biological control. Miscanthus straw was (1) tested to partially replace peat; and (2) pre-colonized with a Trichoderma strain to increase the biological control capacity of the growing media. In two strawberry pot trials (denoted as experiment I & II), extruded and non-extruded miscanthus straw, with or without pre-colonization with T. harzianum T22, was used to partially (20% v/v) replace peat. We tested the performance of each mixture by monitoring strawberry plant development, nutrient content in the leaves and growing media, sensitivity of the fruit to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, rhizosphere community and strawberry defense responses. N immobilization by miscanthus straw reduced strawberry growth and yield in experiment II but not in I. The pre-colonization of the straw with Trichoderma increased the post-harvest disease suppressiveness against B. cinerea and changed the rhizosphere fungal microbiome in both experiments. In addition, defense-related genes were induced in experiment II. The use of miscanthus straw in growing media will reduce the demand for peat and close resource loops. Successful pre-colonization of this straw with biological control fungi will optimize crop cultivation, requiring fewer pesticide applications, which will benefit the environment and human health.
Keywords
disease, nutrients, peat replacement, plant-microbe interactions, strawberry, GROWING MEDIA, BIOLOGICAL-CONTROL, SYSTEMIC RESISTANCE, BOTRYTIS-CINEREA, PLANT-DISEASES, HARZIANUM T39, DAMPING-OFF, ROOT-ROT, FUNGI, SOIL

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MLA
Debode, Jane et al. “Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus Straw Can Replace Peat in Strawberry Cultivation, with Beneficial Effects on Disease Control.” FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE 9 (2018): n. pag. Print.
APA
Debode, J., De Tender, C., Cremelie, P., Lee, A. S., Kyndt, T., Muylle, H., De Swaef, T., et al. (2018). Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus straw can replace peat in strawberry cultivation, with beneficial effects on disease control. FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE, 9.
Chicago author-date
Debode, Jane, Caroline De Tender, Pieter Cremelie, Ana Shein Lee, Tina Kyndt, Hilde Muylle, Tom De Swaef, and Bart Vandecasteele. 2018. “Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus Straw Can Replace Peat in Strawberry Cultivation, with Beneficial Effects on Disease Control.” Frontiers in Plant Science 9.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Debode, Jane, Caroline De Tender, Pieter Cremelie, Ana Shein Lee, Tina Kyndt, Hilde Muylle, Tom De Swaef, and Bart Vandecasteele. 2018. “Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus Straw Can Replace Peat in Strawberry Cultivation, with Beneficial Effects on Disease Control.” Frontiers in Plant Science 9.
Vancouver
1.
Debode J, De Tender C, Cremelie P, Lee AS, Kyndt T, Muylle H, et al. Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus straw can replace peat in strawberry cultivation, with beneficial effects on disease control. FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE. 2018;9.
IEEE
[1]
J. Debode et al., “Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus straw can replace peat in strawberry cultivation, with beneficial effects on disease control,” FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE, vol. 9, 2018.
@article{8592126,
  abstract     = {Peat based growing media are not ecologically sustainable and often fail to support biological control. Miscanthus straw was (1) tested to partially replace peat; and (2) pre-colonized with a Trichoderma strain to increase the biological control capacity of the growing media. In two strawberry pot trials (denoted as experiment I & II), extruded and non-extruded miscanthus straw, with or without pre-colonization with T. harzianum T22, was used to partially (20% v/v) replace peat. We tested the performance of each mixture by monitoring strawberry plant development, nutrient content in the leaves and growing media, sensitivity of the fruit to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, rhizosphere community and strawberry defense responses. N immobilization by miscanthus straw reduced strawberry growth and yield in experiment II but not in I. The pre-colonization of the straw with Trichoderma increased the post-harvest disease suppressiveness against B. cinerea and changed the rhizosphere fungal microbiome in both experiments. In addition, defense-related genes were induced in experiment II. The use of miscanthus straw in growing media will reduce the demand for peat and close resource loops. Successful pre-colonization of this straw with biological control fungi will optimize crop cultivation, requiring fewer pesticide applications, which will benefit the environment and human health.},
  articleno    = {213},
  author       = {Debode, Jane and De Tender, Caroline and Cremelie, Pieter and Lee, Ana Shein and Kyndt, Tina and Muylle, Hilde and De Swaef, Tom and Vandecasteele, Bart},
  issn         = {1664-462X},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE},
  keywords     = {disease,nutrients,peat replacement,plant-microbe interactions,strawberry,GROWING MEDIA,BIOLOGICAL-CONTROL,SYSTEMIC RESISTANCE,BOTRYTIS-CINEREA,PLANT-DISEASES,HARZIANUM T39,DAMPING-OFF,ROOT-ROT,FUNGI,SOIL},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {15},
  title        = {Trichoderma-Inoculated Miscanthus straw can replace peat in strawberry cultivation, with beneficial effects on disease control},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.00213},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2018},
}

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