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The pore structure of hydrating cementitious materials visualized and studied by NMR and MIP

Didier Snoeck (UGent) , Leo Pel and Nele De Belie (UGent)
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Abstract
During cement hydration the pore structure is continuously changing and becoming denser. It is difficult to study this porosity in time without destroying the samples and stopping hydration. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) can be applied to non-destructively study not only the total water content but also the pore size distribution. In this research, the T2 relaxation times were studied, which are proportional to the pore size distribution. The obtained pore sizes are compared to different models found in literature: the Powers and Brownyard, Feldman and Sereda and the Jennings Colloidal Model (CM-II) model. Furthermore, the obtained results are compared with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP) data on the same samples. A good correlation was obtained when using planar pores for the T2 experiments. The main pore sizes found are in the range of 1.5-2 nm and of 8-12 nm reflecting the gel pores. In addition some bigger capillary pores (10 to 1000 nm) are found. These correspond to values used in the models and results obtained with MIP on hardened samples with and without superabsorbent polymers. NMR is an effective technique to study the water signals in different pores as a function of time and to relate it to the pore structure development.
Keywords
hydration, kinetics, pore size distribution, cement paste, polymers, NMR

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Chicago
Snoeck, Didier, Leo Pel, and Nele De Belie. 2018. “The Pore Structure of Hydrating Cementitious Materials Visualized and Studied by NMR and MIP.” In Nanotechnology in Construction (NICOM6), 1–9.
APA
Snoeck, D., Pel, L., & De Belie, N. (2018). The pore structure of hydrating cementitious materials visualized and studied by NMR and MIP. Nanotechnology in construction (NICOM6) (pp. 1–9). Presented at the Nanotechnology in construction (NICOM6).
Vancouver
1.
Snoeck D, Pel L, De Belie N. The pore structure of hydrating cementitious materials visualized and studied by NMR and MIP. Nanotechnology in construction (NICOM6). 2018. p. 1–9.
MLA
Snoeck, Didier, Leo Pel, and Nele De Belie. “The Pore Structure of Hydrating Cementitious Materials Visualized and Studied by NMR and MIP.” Nanotechnology in Construction (NICOM6). 2018. 1–9. Print.
@inproceedings{8591920,
  abstract     = {During cement hydration the pore structure is continuously changing and becoming denser. It is difficult to study this porosity in time without destroying the samples and stopping hydration. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) can be applied to non-destructively study not only the total water content but also the pore size distribution. In this research, the T2 relaxation times were studied, which are proportional to the pore size distribution. The obtained pore sizes are compared to different models found in literature: the Powers and Brownyard, Feldman and Sereda and the Jennings Colloidal Model (CM-II) model. Furthermore, the obtained results are compared with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP) data on the same samples. A good correlation was obtained when using planar pores for the T2 experiments. The main pore sizes found are in the range of 1.5-2 nm and of 8-12 nm reflecting the gel pores. In addition some bigger capillary pores (10 to 1000 nm) are found. These correspond to values used in the models and results obtained with MIP on hardened samples with and without superabsorbent polymers. NMR is an effective technique to study the water signals in different pores as a function of time and to relate it to the pore structure development.},
  author       = {Snoeck, Didier and Pel, Leo and De Belie, Nele},
  booktitle    = {Nanotechnology in construction (NICOM6)},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Hong Kong},
  pages        = {1--9},
  title        = {The pore structure of hydrating cementitious materials visualized and studied by NMR and MIP},
  year         = {2018},
}