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A prokaryotic-eukaryotic relation in the fat body of Bombus terrestris

Anneleen Parmentier (UGent) , Annelies Billiet (UGent) , Guy Smagghe (UGent) , Peter Vandamme (UGent) , Dieter Deforce (UGent) , Filip Van Nieuwerburgh (UGent) and Ivan Meeus (UGent)
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Abstract
The interaction between the insect host and its microbiota plays a central role in insect health and is mostly studied in relation to the digestive system. Nonetheless, there are numerous microorganisms occupying multiple habitats in and on insects. We studied microbial communities in the gut and fat body of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) using the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene on the Illumina MiSeq platform. In one of the two study locations, the fat body microbial composition was marked by the dominant presence of Arsenophonus sp. and Phyllobacterium sp. Bumblebees infected with Apicystis bombi, a eukaryotic parasite multiplying in the fat body, had a significant higher relative abundance of Arsenophonus sp. compared with the non-infected individuals. In general, the infection of A. bombi correlated with a more interlinked microbial association network, as we observed an increase of significant associations between the relative abundance of bacteria present in the gut and fat body of infected bumblebees. The causality within this potential prokaryotic-eukaryotic relation is important when assessing the health impact on bees.
Keywords
APICYSTIS-BOMBI, APIS-MELLIFERA, BACTERIA, GUT, DIVERSITY, BUMBLEBEES, MICROBIOTA, BEES, METABOLISM, PARASITES

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MLA
Parmentier, Anneleen et al. “A Prokaryotic-eukaryotic Relation in the Fat Body of Bombus Terrestris.” ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY REPORTS 10.6 (2018): 644–650. Print.
APA
Parmentier, A., Billiet, A., Smagghe, G., Vandamme, P., Deforce, D., Van Nieuwerburgh, F., & Meeus, I. (2018). A prokaryotic-eukaryotic relation in the fat body of Bombus terrestris. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY REPORTS, 10(6), 644–650.
Chicago author-date
Parmentier, Anneleen, Annelies Billiet, Guy Smagghe, Peter Vandamme, Dieter Deforce, Filip Van Nieuwerburgh, and Ivan Meeus. 2018. “A Prokaryotic-eukaryotic Relation in the Fat Body of Bombus Terrestris.” Environmental Microbiology Reports 10 (6): 644–650.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Parmentier, Anneleen, Annelies Billiet, Guy Smagghe, Peter Vandamme, Dieter Deforce, Filip Van Nieuwerburgh, and Ivan Meeus. 2018. “A Prokaryotic-eukaryotic Relation in the Fat Body of Bombus Terrestris.” Environmental Microbiology Reports 10 (6): 644–650.
Vancouver
1.
Parmentier A, Billiet A, Smagghe G, Vandamme P, Deforce D, Van Nieuwerburgh F, et al. A prokaryotic-eukaryotic relation in the fat body of Bombus terrestris. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY REPORTS. 2018;10(6):644–50.
IEEE
[1]
A. Parmentier et al., “A prokaryotic-eukaryotic relation in the fat body of Bombus terrestris,” ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY REPORTS, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 644–650, 2018.
@article{8591872,
  abstract     = {The interaction between the insect host and its microbiota plays a central role in insect health and is mostly studied in relation to the digestive system. Nonetheless, there are numerous microorganisms occupying multiple habitats in and on insects. We studied microbial communities in the gut and fat body of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) using the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene on the Illumina MiSeq platform. In one of the two study locations, the fat body microbial composition was marked by the dominant presence of Arsenophonus sp. and Phyllobacterium sp. Bumblebees infected with Apicystis bombi, a eukaryotic parasite multiplying in the fat body, had a significant higher relative abundance of Arsenophonus sp. compared with the non-infected individuals. In general, the infection of A. bombi correlated with a more interlinked microbial association network, as we observed an increase of significant associations between the relative abundance of bacteria present in the gut and fat body of infected bumblebees. The causality within this potential prokaryotic-eukaryotic relation is important when assessing the health impact on bees.},
  author       = {Parmentier, Anneleen and Billiet, Annelies and Smagghe, Guy and Vandamme, Peter and Deforce, Dieter and Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip and Meeus, Ivan},
  issn         = {1758-2229},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY REPORTS},
  keywords     = {APICYSTIS-BOMBI,APIS-MELLIFERA,BACTERIA,GUT,DIVERSITY,BUMBLEBEES,MICROBIOTA,BEES,METABOLISM,PARASITES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {644--650},
  title        = {A prokaryotic-eukaryotic relation in the fat body of Bombus terrestris},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1758-2229.12673},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2018},
}

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