Advanced search
1 file | 406.70 KB

Children conform, adults resist : a robot group induced peer pressure on normative social conformity

(2018) SCIENCE ROBOTICS. 3(21). p.1-7
Author
Organization
Abstract
People are known to change their behavior and decisions to conform to others, even for obviously incorrect facts. Because of recent developments in artificial intelligence and robotics, robots are increasingly found in human environments, and there, they form a novel social presence. It is as yet unclear whether and to what extent these social robots are able to exert pressure similar to human peers. This study used the Asch paradigm, which shows how participants conform to others while performing a visual judgment task. We first replicated the finding that adults are influenced by their peers but showed that they resist social pressure from a group of small humanoid robots. Next, we repeated the study with 7- to 9-year-old children and showed that children conform to the robots. This raises opportunities as well as concerns for the use of social robots with young and vulnerable cross-sections of society; although conforming can be beneficial, the potential for misuse and the potential impact of erroneous performance cannot be ignored.
Keywords
PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN, INTERACTIVE ROBOTS, COMPUTERS, RESPONSES, BEHAVIOR, AGE, MACHINES, MAJORITY, AUTISM, TASK

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 406.70 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vollmer, Anna-Lisa, Robin Read, Dries Trippas, and Tony Belpaeme. 2018. “Children Conform, Adults Resist : a Robot Group Induced Peer Pressure on Normative Social Conformity.” Science Robotics 3 (21): 1–7.
APA
Vollmer, A.-L., Read, R., Trippas, D., & Belpaeme, T. (2018). Children conform, adults resist : a robot group induced peer pressure on normative social conformity. SCIENCE ROBOTICS, 3(21), 1–7.
Vancouver
1.
Vollmer A-L, Read R, Trippas D, Belpaeme T. Children conform, adults resist : a robot group induced peer pressure on normative social conformity. SCIENCE ROBOTICS. Washington: Amer Assoc Advancement Science; 2018;3(21):1–7.
MLA
Vollmer, Anna-Lisa et al. “Children Conform, Adults Resist : a Robot Group Induced Peer Pressure on Normative Social Conformity.” SCIENCE ROBOTICS 3.21 (2018): 1–7. Print.
@article{8591165,
  abstract     = {People are known to change their behavior and decisions to conform to others, even for obviously incorrect facts. Because of recent developments in artificial intelligence and robotics, robots are increasingly found in human environments, and there, they form a novel social presence. It is as yet unclear whether and to what extent these social robots are able to exert pressure similar to human peers. This study used the Asch paradigm, which shows how participants conform to others while performing a visual judgment task. We first replicated the finding that adults are influenced by their peers but showed that they resist social pressure from a group of small humanoid robots. Next, we repeated the study with 7- to 9-year-old children and showed that children conform to the robots. This raises opportunities as well as concerns for the use of social robots with young and vulnerable cross-sections of society; although conforming can be beneficial, the potential for misuse and the potential impact of erroneous performance cannot be ignored.},
  articleno    = {UNSP eaat7111},
  author       = {Vollmer, Anna-Lisa and Read, Robin and Trippas, Dries and Belpaeme, Tony},
  issn         = {2470-9476},
  journal      = {SCIENCE ROBOTICS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {21},
  pages        = {UNSP eaat7111:1--UNSP eaat7111:7},
  publisher    = {Amer Assoc Advancement Science},
  title        = {Children conform, adults resist : a robot group induced peer pressure on normative social conformity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scirobotics.aat7111},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2018},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: