Advanced search
1 file | 799.60 KB

Agglutinative noun inflection in Cappadocian

Mark Janse (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Cappadocian is well-known for having two types of agglutinative inflec-tions: (1) mílos ‘mill’, gen. míloz-ju, pl. míloz-ja; (2) néka, pl. néc-es, gen. néc-ez-ju. This chapter shows on the basis of a detailed investigation of the dialectal evidence how these agglutinative inflections originated in the plural of the inherited masculine nouns in -os due to a number of specifically Cappadocian innovations involving deletion of unstressed [i] and [u], differential object marking and the distinction between animate and inanimate nouns and, last but not least, pattern replication from Turkish. It is argued that the two types traditionally recognized as being agglutinative are actually analogical extensions of innovations which originated in the novel plural inflection of animate masculine nouns in -os.
Keywords
Cappadocian Greek, Central Anatolian Turkish, language contact, pattern replication, fusional morphology, agglutinative morphology, noun inflection

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 799.60 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Janse, Mark. 2019. “Agglutinative Noun Inflection in Cappadocian.” In The Morphology of Asia Minor Greek, ed. Angela Ralli. Vol. 13. Leiden: Brill.
APA
Janse, M. (2019). Agglutinative noun inflection in Cappadocian. In A. Ralli (Ed.), The morphology of Asia Minor Greek (Vol. 13). Leiden: Brill.
Vancouver
1.
Janse M. Agglutinative noun inflection in Cappadocian. In: Ralli A, editor. The morphology of Asia Minor Greek. Leiden: Brill; 2019.
MLA
Janse, Mark. “Agglutinative Noun Inflection in Cappadocian.” The Morphology of Asia Minor Greek. Ed. Angela Ralli. Vol. 13. Leiden: Brill, 2019. Print.
@incollection{8587492,
  abstract     = {Cappadocian is well-known for having two types of agglutinative inflec-tions: (1) m{\'i}los {\textquoteleft}mill{\textquoteright}, gen. m{\'i}loz-ju, pl. m{\'i}loz-ja; (2) n{\'e}ka, pl. n{\'e}c-es, gen. n{\'e}c-ez-ju. This chapter shows on the basis of a detailed investigation of the dialectal evidence how these agglutinative inflections originated in the plural of the inherited masculine nouns in  -os due to a number of specifically Cappadocian innovations involving deletion of unstressed [i] and [u], differential object marking and the distinction between animate and inanimate nouns and, last but not least, pattern replication from Turkish. It is argued that the two types traditionally recognized as being agglutinative are actually analogical extensions of innovations which originated in the novel plural inflection of animate masculine nouns in -os.},
  author       = {Janse, Mark},
  booktitle    = {The morphology of Asia Minor Greek},
  editor       = {Ralli, Angela},
  isbn         = {9789004394506},
  keyword      = {Cappadocian Greek,Central Anatolian Turkish,language contact,pattern replication,fusional morphology,agglutinative morphology,noun inflection},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {56},
  publisher    = {Brill},
  series       = {Empirical approaches to linguistic theory},
  title        = {Agglutinative noun inflection in Cappadocian},
  url          = {https://brill.com/view/title/54312},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2019},
}